Octopuses collect shells and other objects they find on the sea floor and take them back to their caves to arrange and rearrange them. Crazy, right? Think how much work you could get done with an eight-legged cephalopod as your interior designer.

Octopuses collect shells and other objects they find on the sea floor and take them back to their caves to arrange and rearrange them. Crazy, right? Think how much work you could get done with an eight-legged cephalopod as your interior designer.

OK, they're not so much decorating as they are creating protective fortresses (also called gardens, a fact that inspired Ringo's "Octopus's Garden"). Still, octopuses' spatial intelligence and love for shiny things only enhances their creeptastic charm.

Enter: Adam Wallacavage. The Philly photographer is most famous for his stunning chandeliers that look like octopus tentacles. At once baroque and bizarre, the ornate fixtures look like they could squirm to life with the flip of a switch. Check them out at adamwallacavage.com.

Wallacavage is a bright light in the field of objet de art chandeliers, but his works are typically "price upon request" sorts of deals, likely to cost the average Joe an arm and a tentacle (one is priced around $6,000).

Stores have gotten in on the act, though, offering interesting chandeliers in a retail setting. Anthropologie sells a $1,800 Tea Time Chandelier. The piece mimics traditional design but is made out of old tea cups and utensils.

The trend of repurposing items into new designs seems made for chandeliers. Browse Etsy for some really interesting upcycled light fixtures. Chandeliers made from deconstructed bike rims, wheels and spokes by Texas' ReMain Designs are noteworthy ($75 to $700).

Also cool are vinyl records Blacklick artist David Gobeli shapes into hanging light pendants ($36). Gobeli sells his work through a line named after his dog, BasilicusJones. Shop for his vinyl chandelier online (basilicusjones.etsy.com) or find other works by Gobeli at EcoFlora or SoBo Style in Clintonville.

As for hanging these bad boys, pendants and chandeliers dangle, give or take, 30 inches above a tabletop. But who says it has to be over a table? Surreal lighting begs for surreal placement. Try setting it up in an unexpected spot in a room.

And, unless you have an electrician's background, trying to hang one of these alone will leave you wishing you had eight arms yourself. Leave the installation to a professional.

Objects of Desire is a bi-weekly column that explores the items Columbus shoppers crave. Follow Jackie Mantey on Twitter at @Jackie_Mantey.