On the first Sunday in December, the businesses and residents of German Village take the concept of making seasons bright and run with it. The annual Village Lights event casts the neighborhood's brick sidewalks in the glow of thousands of holiday luminaria, lighting the way to nearby shopping and dining.

On the first Sunday in December, the businesses and residents of German Village take the concept of making seasons bright and run with it. The annual Village Lights event casts the neighborhood's brick sidewalks in the glow of thousands of holiday luminaria, lighting the way to nearby shopping and dining.

For going on three years, the German Village Art League has joined in with "Illuminating ART." The all-member show features works priced for giving and an opening timed to give first dibs to Village Lights visitors. Gallery 831 is hosting this year's edition, including a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Sunday with sweet treats from Juergen's Bakery.

More than 60 artists, collectively covering virtually every visual medium, have joined the neighborhood artist organization since it was founded in 2009. As GVAL founder and "Illuminating ART" organizer Ryan Orewiler explained, the organization provides its members with opportunities for networking, critiques and showcases such as the holiday exhibition.

"Village Lights illuminates the historic houses, businesses and streets. Why not illuminate art, too?" he said.

A member artist at Studios on High who's also shown his large cityscapes at galleries throughout the city, Orewiler will be contributing to "Illuminating ART," as will his event co-chair, animator and illustrator Sonya Lucas. At least two dozen fellow GVAL artists will be joining them, including ceramicist Todd Hickerson, fiber artist Abby Feinknopf and glass mosaic artist Beth Himsworth.

Here's a sample of whom else to expect.

W.E. Arnold

A Springfield native and travel photographer, Arnold has produced a number of images that capture the Columbus skyline from its best angles.

Sherry Simone

The artist states that experience in the medical field and early childhood education infuse her abstract canvases, which offer contained explosions of vibrant color.

Mona Gazala

Though she's moved back to her hometown of Cleveland and started an artist organization there in the mold of GVAL, Gazala is still fairly active locally. She'll be sharing a piece from a series that mixes graphite, ink and other materials with imagery of classical sculpture.