The good news for Robert De Niro is that, in a few years, the likelihood of anyone remembering his appearance as a dying cancer patient in "New Year's Eve" is fairly slim, since the film marks a career low for so many members of its massive cast.

The good news for Robert De Niro is that, in a few years, the likelihood of anyone remembering his appearance as a dying cancer patient in "New Year's Eve" is fairly slim, since the film marks a career low for so many members of its massive cast.

Following in the footsteps of his disastrous "Valentine's Day," director Garry Marshall has apparently cornered the market in sappy, unrealistic, overstuffed romcoms. Both films weave together a series of meandering stories that are sure to overlap late in the film as the title holiday hits it climax.

The biggest problem with "New Year's Eve" is that none of these stories are even remotely interesting.

Caterer Katherine Heigl verbally spars with her rock star ex-boyfriend Jon Bon Jovi while Seth Meyers and Jessica Biel attempt to have the first baby of 2012. Hilary Swank deals with problems with the Times Square ball drop, and Sarah Jessica Parker tries to keep teenage daughter Abigail Breslin from going out in the city alone.

The film isn't a total disaster - Sofia Vergara's usual sultry schtick is still mildly entertaining - but with only a few passable storylines crammed amid dozens of awful ones, it's hard to call this film only remotely successful.