Before the "South Park" creators' "Book of Mormon" began sending crowds into hysterics with its religious satire earlier this year, jukebox musicals were the biggest thing to hit the Broadway stage in recent years. (Joseph Smith, so hot right now.) The plays that use old pop songs as their soundtracks are practically guaranteed to be successful, considering their music already captured the hearts of millions of fans.

Before the "South Park" creators' "Book of Mormon" began sending crowds into hysterics with its religious satire earlier this year, jukebox musicals were the biggest thing to hit the Broadway stage in recent years. (Joseph Smith, so hot right now.) The plays that use old pop songs as their soundtracks are practically guaranteed to be successful, considering their music already captured the hearts of millions of fans.

Unlike "Jersey Boys," the most recent jukebox musical to visit Columbus, "Mamma Mia!" is not a biographical tale. It uses ABBA's classic songs from the 1970s - including "Voulez Vous," "Super Trouper" and, of course, "Mamma Mia" - to help tell the fictional tale of Sophie, a young woman who is preparing for her wedding.

"It's such a feel-good musical," said Stephanie Barnum, who plays Ali, one of Sophie's friends. "It makes the whole audience light up."

In the show, Sophie - who was raised by her mother, Donna, on a Greek island - is about to get married, but there's one problem: She wants her father to walk her down the aisle, and she doesn't know who he is. After finding her mother's old diary, Sophie deduces that her dad could be one of three men. She invites all three of them to the wedding, under the assumption that she'll immediately know who her father is when she sees him.

Wedding guests - including the three men - arrive on the island, and Donna reunites with the two other members of her girl group from the '70s. Cue bell-sleeved disco outfits and "Dancing Queen."

Sophie doesn't recognize her father at first sight, but both she and her mother end up developing lasting relationships with the men.

ABBA's unique vocals require the actors to use their voices in a way that's uncommon in musical theater, Barnum explained. To get the classic group's simple, vibrato-free sound, the cast members sing with a straight tone, which is harder on the vocal cords than normal singing. But the cast is eager to do it for the sake of the music.

"Their music is such a specific style," Barnum said of ABBA. "No one else sounds like them."