Suffocating paralysis that gets in and out faster than a mobster underling's blow to the kneecaps - I expect such jarring physical impact from a band called Petit Mal. I expect a band that will intermittently cause my eyes to roll back in brief departures from consciousness. I hoped for such an experience last Tuesday when the new Columbus indie rock outfit played The Summit.

Suffocating paralysis that gets in and out faster than a mobster underling's blow to the kneecaps - I expect such jarring physical impact from a band called Petit Mal. I expect a band that will intermittently cause my eyes to roll back in brief departures from consciousness. I hoped for such an experience last Tuesday when the new Columbus indie rock outfit played The Summit.

Evocative name aside, Petit Mal's pedigree amped up my anticipation. The lineup seems to orbit bassist Nat Hagey; the other three members have played with him in Pirate (drummer Michael Murtha), Wing & Tusk (guitarist Roseanne Claiborne) and St. Moses the Black (singer-guitarist DJ Fitzgerald).

These were some of the finest bands on the Columbus rock landscape in recent years, ambitious and artful ensembles that each seemed destined for widespread success before burning out or fading away. I assumed after the requisite music scene reshuffling they'd be working on something stunning again.

Hagey may be the pivot point that brought these musicians together, but he wasn't the focal point on stage Tuesday. Their presence was egalitarian, each member contributing his or her own essence. A waterfall of enthusiasm was in effect, from Murtha's slightly frightening zeal in mauling his drums down through Hagey and Fitzgerald and on to Claiborne, stoic in her deployment of economic shoegaze static. Their synchronicity hinted at their history with each other, particularly the rhythm section of Hagey and Murtha.

Fitzgerald, who helmed St. Moses' gorgeous psych-pop and played in the vegan hardcore band CHRIST, lends his understated presence to a third kind of songwriting here. San Francisco neo-garage greats Thee Oh Sees and The Fresh & Onlys are listed as influences on Facebook, and while I would have never imagined this combination of players making that kind of music, Tuesday's concert positioned Petit Mal as compatriots in the Bay Area's pursuit of a lean, streamlined psychedelic ideal.

Such subtly complex music takes me a few listens to parse, so I hope their demo comes out soon for further perusal. Their taut explorations of noise and melody didn't launch me to heaven on first pass - impossibly high expectations for a band on its fifth show, my bad - but they scraped the stratosphere enough to keep my ear eagerly anticipating what's next.