The world is quickly coming to believe that all handheld objects should have touch screens. The YouTube video of a baby delighted by an iPad, but confused by a magazine, has been proof of that for its more than 3.3 million viewers.

The world is quickly coming to believe that all handheld objects should have touch screens. The YouTube video of a baby delighted by an iPad, but confused by a magazine, has been proof of that for its more than 3.3 million viewers.

So why not a watch with a touch screen? Tissot - a 159-year-old Swiss watch-making company - created just such a gadget in their collection of Touch watches ($625 to $1,550,tissotshop.com)

The Tissot T Touch II Men's Black Quartz Touch Watch is a typical model in the line.

Press the center button on the side of the watch (near 3 o' clock) and it activates the tactile sapphire crystal which lets you access 13 features, including a barometer, compass, altimeter, alarm, chronograph and thermometer. The hands of the watch combine with a LCD screen on the lower third of the watch face to provide readings for these features.

The watches come in various styles for divers, pilots, sailors, outdoor enthusiasts or for dressy occasions. The watch band comes in rubber, stainless steel or titanium.

Do you sometimes forget where you parked? A crowded mall parking lot can do that. FMC Smart, a project that was recently at 180 percent of needed funding on Kickstarter, will be shipping its Find My Car Smart devices ($40) next month.

Once you buy the gadget, you'll also have to have an iPhone 4S and FMC's 99-cent app for the system to work. Find My Car Smart is the first product making use of the phone's Bluetooth Smart technology. Unlike other iPhone apps that claim to find your car, only this one automatically records the location of your vehicle as soon as you switch it off. No matter where you then walk - or how lost you get - a map on your iPhone will direct you where you need to go to find your auto.

Have you ever bought Army surplus gear? A Long Island household fixtures shop called Piet Houtenbos has repurposed U. S Army armaments into a trio of oil lamps called Grenade Oil Lamps ($69, piethoutenbos.com). The gadgets are made from a traditional pineapple grenade, a lemon-shaped smoke/flash bomb or a high impact ball shape. They come in natural, gold or silver finishes.