Nostalgia propagates in cycles, and while stylized '80s tributes are far from dead (see: "Drive," M83, the underground cassette resurgence, etc.), the focus of pop-culture excavation seems to be shifting toward the 1990s (see: Portlandia's "The Dream of the '90s is Alive in Portland" sketch, the addition of '90s dance tracks to Skully's signature Ladies '80s dance night, last year's Pavement and Guided by Voices reunions, etc.) No wonder three of the biggest concerts in Columbus this week feature headliners that reached their peak before the dot-com bubble burst.

Nostalgia propagates in cycles, and while stylized '80s tributes are far from dead (see: "Drive," M83, the underground cassette resurgence, etc.), the focus of pop-culture excavation seems to be shifting toward the 1990s (see: Portlandia's "The Dream of the '90s is Alive in Portland" sketch, the addition of '90s dance tracks to Skully's signature Ladies '80s dance night, last year's Pavement and Guided by Voices reunions, etc.) No wonder three of the biggest concerts in Columbus this week feature headliners that reached their peak before the dot-com bubble burst.

Representing the alt-rock era, there's The Lemonheads, who'll perform the 1992 classic "It's a Shame About Ray" in its entirety Tuesday at The Basement. Frontman Evan Dando will play some tracks solo, but for others he'll be joined by Bad Brains' Chuck Treece on drums and Taking Back Sunday's Fred Mascherino on bass. True, they weren't in the band back then, but just close your eyes and picture scenes from "Wayne's World."

Moving on to the mid-'90s, Cleveland rappers Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, whose legacy is undergoing a facelift as they inspire rising talents ASAP Rocky and Kendrick Lamar, hit the Newport on Sunday - sort of. The performance features Krayzie Bone and Wish Bone, just two of the original five-man lineup (Krayzie, played Skully's last month). Still, XXL gave this tour a rave review, so anyone jonesing for some thuggish, ruggish Bone will likely be satiated, Layzie, Bizzy and Flesh be damned.

Rounding out our tour of the decade is Matt Pryor, frontman for emo stalwarts The Get Up Kids and their lesser cousins The New Amsterdams. Pryor, touring behind solo album "May Day," plays Rumba Cafe's solo showcase Where's the Band alongside two Columbus frontmen who represent aspects of his persona: pop-minded emo (House of Heroes' Tim Skipper) and corn-fed Midwestern grit (Two Cow Garage's Micah Schnabel).