I once tried to count the number of concerts I've been to since the music bug hit me in middle school. Sadly I lost count - or maybe just lost interest in counting - around show No. 400. There were quite a few duds in there (without question, Creed was the worst), but I've learned I can rely on MuteMath to put on a great show. The New Orleans pop-rockers with a subtle Christian positivity consistently floors me, and heck, I'm Jewish. Drummer Darren King is a technical beast, with headphones gaffer-taped to his head so they stay on while he attacks his set. King's energetic bandmates chip in on percussion duties; they did the whole guitarists-playing-drums-at-climaxes thing long before it became passe. And singer Paul Meany, who seems incapable of singing out of tune, alternates between performing handstands on his keyboard and rocking out on a keytar. Count on Saturday night's show at the Newport to be exhilarating and uplifting.

I once tried to count the number of concerts Iíve been to since the music bug hit me in middle school. Sadly I lost count ó or maybe just lost interest in counting ó around show No. 400. There were quite a few duds in there (without question, Creed was the worst), but Iíve learned I can rely on MuteMath to put on a great show. The New Orleans pop-rockers with a subtle Christian positivity consistently floors me, and heck, Iím Jewish. Drummer Darren King is a technical beast, with headphones gaffer-taped to his head so they stay on while he attacks his set. Kingís energetic bandmates chip in on percussion duties; they did the whole guitarists-playing-drums-at-climaxes thing long before it became passe. And singer Paul Meany, who seems incapable of singing out of tune, alternates between performing handstands on his keyboard and rocking out on a keytar. Count on Saturday nightís show at the Newport to be exhilarating and uplifting.

Colin Gray photo