New salon: Blake Rose Salon & Spa

By Columbus Alive
From the May 31, 2012 edition

A lot has happened to Melissa and Bryan Beaver in the past three years. They met (several of Melissa’s family members were Bryan’s clients), got married (following a public beach proposal complete with a plane’s banner popping the question), had a baby (now a darling 11-month-old named Blake Rose) and opened a salon (also named Blake Rose).

Bryan has worked as a hair stylist in Columbus for 12 years. He has created looks and cut for clients at local spaces such as Kenneth’s and Salon Lofts, and has designed styles for national fashion magazines like Elle and Vogue.

“I’ve seen a need for a hair salon that encourages both the independent spirit of the veteran stylist but is also supported by a state-of-the-art, full-service facility and very recognizable brand,” Bryan said.

The new space, Blake Rose Salon & Spa, aims to bring together the best features of salons on the East and West Coasts — a luxurious full-service menu, repurposed decor with a modern edge, intimate cutting stations and a space for socializing, aka the salon’s center blowout bar.

In addition to hair-cutting services — the costs of which depend on the stylist but can start at around $25 for men and $35 for women — Blake Rose will offer coloring, styling, natural nail manicures and pedicures, therapeutic massages, waxing and spray tanning services. Alterna products are also available.

Blake Rose’s interior design echo the salon’s philosophy of creating a space that is high-end but approachable.

“I wanted it to feel big city but be filled with down-to-earth people,” Bryan said. “Feel East and West Coast fancy but still be very inviting.”

For example, reclaimed barn wood and recycled bricks from a Grandview home were worked into the interior design. And each private room where clients get their hair cut has a small flatscreen TV that clients can manage as they see fit.

Adding to the local vibe, the salon offers coffee from Cafe Brioso and features artwork provided by the Short North’s 83 Gallery. The only piece of art not for sale is a painting of roses they “had to buy from Mouton when we saw it there,” Melissa said. Just another ode to baby Blake.

Philanthropic endeavors will be a constant part of the business, Bryan said. He plans to offer makeovers once a month or so for local residents with multiple sclerosis and for candidates recommended by Dress for Success Columbus.

“We’re so blessed that we’re doing so well in a bad economy, and we’re blessed to have the opportunity to help others who aren’t as fortunate,” Bryan said. “It’s a way to help us stay grounded, to put things into perspective.”