Staff pick: Necropolis reunion at Ace of Cups

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From the September 9, 2012 edition

A great band is reuniting for a great cause Thursday.

First, the cause: Six years ago, beloved Columbus music fixture Daymon Dodson died of complications from a seizure. He left behind a vast, interconnected underground music scene, many of those connections forged by him. And his friends from those intersecting communities — punks, rappers, DJs, metalheads, indie rockers — have been keeping his collaborative spirit alive ever since with the annual Daymon Day Parade.

In advance of this year’s Sept. 15 parade, a pair of Daymon Day fundraisers are happening this week at Ace of Cups: Necropolis, Envelope & DJ Detox and Tree of Fern on Thursday followed by Path, Zero Star and Triangle Piece on Saturday. DJ True Skillz spins both nights.

Thursday’s show in particular is a throwback to Dodson’s heyday.

“It could be a show that happened six years ago,” Necropolis singer-guitarist Bo Davis said. “This show may have already happened six years ago.”

Which brings us to the band: Necropolis, one of the strongest links in the chain of weirdo punk bands from Ohio over the years and a mainstay of the flourishing community orbiting Columbus Discount Records circa 2006.

“You could play a show in the middle of the week and it would be a packed bar,” Davis said. “It kind of all just clicked for some reason. Space and time came together.”

Playing in tribute to Dodson seemed like the right occasion to get Necropolis on stage after the band flickered away in recent years because of typical factors like jobs, babies and other bands.

“We never really broke up, but we stopped practicing,” Davis said.

The version of Necropolis performing Thursday is especially era-appropriate. When latter-day drummer Mat Bisaro was unavailable, original drummer Kyle Heiberger agreed to play a set of songs from “The Hackled Ruff and Shoulder Mane,” the skronking, spasmodic 2006 LP that functions as the definitive document of the band’s first act. Selections from the “Workingman” 7-inch might sneak into the set, too.

Thus, by coincidence, “We’re doing the stuff Daymon would have heard us play,” Davis said.