Preview: October Gallery Hop

  • Photo by Tim Johnson
  • Photo by Tim Johnson
    A painted helmet for “Thirty Three Quarters” by Sara Sammartino.
  • “Dog walking in Columbus,” by John Habela
  • Dreamstick by John Habela
  • “The greatest thing on the black earth,” by Tom Kelly
By Columbus Alive
From the October 4, 2012 edition

“Thirty Three Quarters”

“Everybody is in badass mode,” remarked Heidi Brulport as her motorcycle club, Devils Mustache, was photographed for this picture. “Oh, dear.”

This ain’t your drunk uncle’s motorcycle gang. Forget the shanking, Devils Mustache deals in cute girls, fun boys and party times.

“We were all hanging out anyway,” said Trenton Brulport, Heidi’s husband and rider of a hand-built Chopper called Lay Lady Lace. “It really was something to talk about, to entertain ourselves.”

The group of friends started Devils Mustache last year. They ride, camp, party and wear sweet jean vests — with custom skull embroidery by Heidi, of course. Several of the DM members are artists, musicians and designers, and this week they will host their first art show, “Thirty Three Quarters,” at Milk Bar. (Milk Bar’s owner, Kareem Jackson, is in a “rival” bike club and a harbinger of the custom bike scene to town.)

Thirty artists, some of whom are professional motorcycle painters, created art on open-faced (also called three-quarter) helmets, which Biltwell donated to the project. The resulting art helmets range from functional to sculptural, badass to beautiful.

The show will travel to Louisville following its stay at Milk Bar. And Devils Mustache will travel to wherever it damn well pleases.

Lindsay Gallery

Carving and painting supernatural scenes into wood is artist John Habela’s way of sticking it to his demons. Habela gives utilitarian walking sticks artistic and spiritual value.

“Dreamsticks, as I like to call them, are like magical advertising systems, offering protection from evil,” Habela writes about his work for this month’s Lindsay Gallery exhibit. “They can be both psychological and physical weapons, keeping you balanced and fending off foes.”

The stick sculptures’ shapes and lines are guided by the curves of the branches that act as Habela’s canvas. Complementing the carvings will be black and white drawings that are direct interpretations of Habela’s views of everyday life and the protection we could all use from it now and then.

Sean Christopher Gallery Ohio

Selections from painter Tom Kelly’s body of work from the past three years comprise the show “A Shifting World of Light and Darkness.” The unique way time curls its fingers of distortion around the memory of historical events and past lives is key to Kelly’s paintings. Their multiple stained and over-painted layers, some of which are left to erode as the elements see fit, parallel the way memory warps in time.