Arts preview: Surface Tension exhibition showcases fellowships

  • Laura Alexander, Gram, 2011
  • Laura Alexander, Precipitous Division (Detail), 2012
  • Andrea Myers, Rift, 2009
By
From the June 13, 2013 edition

Central Ohio has an artistic culture worth rewarding.

The Columbus Museum of Art will be showcasing the 2012 winners of Greater Columbus Arts Council's Individual Artist Fellowships this week in its newest exhibition, Surface Tension.

Since 1986, the Greater Columbus Arts Council has been awarding a series of fellowships annually to Columbus-based visual artists who have reflected elevated skill and practice in their art work. The prize includes a monetary award alongside exposure at the museum.

“The goal of the fellowship is to support artists,” said Andrea Myers, one of the fellowship recipients. “It gives me the time to actually work in the studio. It really served its purpose in helping to drive my art practice forward.”

For Myers, the money did not only go toward living costs such as daycare for her daughter, but also toward her studio space, supplies and application fees for other art shows.

The specialty of the artist does not matter; art work in the form of crafts, photography, two-dimensional arts and three-dimensional arts are all evaluated in the fellowship decision.

Myers trie to explore additive and subtractive processes in her sculptural works. Her primary medium is textiles.

“The core of it is exploration of the space between two and three dimensionality,” Myers said.

Another fellowship winner, Laura Alexander, experiments with cutting and layering paper. Alexander's works are of varying sizes and layers; her most distinguished piece, “The Tempest II,” is 9 feet by 8 feet.

“I work on an all-white palette normally, and it's all about the shadows and layers. I find a lot of inspiration through nature,” Alexander said.

Included in Surface Tension are two other fellowship winners: Anna Laurie Mackay and Matthew Flegle.

Fellowships such as this help foster the local artist community and allow them to live while producing their work.

“It's really amazing that the museum and the arts council continue this partnership to support local artists in the realm of the museum, on top of having funding for fellowships,” Myers said. “Just having people come to support local artists is important.”