The first time I saw Har Mar Superstar perform in the early aughts, the musician was stripped to his underwear, standing on his head and singing along to a disco-rock track playing on a boom box positioned nearby. Then, as in now, many of his songs were about his sexual conquests - boasts that seemed somehow out-of-place considering his Ron Jeremy-esque appearance.

The first time I saw Har Mar Superstar perform in the early aughts, the musician was stripped to his underwear, standing on his head and singing along to a disco-rock track playing on a boom box positioned nearby. Then, as in now, many of his songs were about his sexual conquests ó boasts that seemed somehow out-of-place considering his Ron Jeremy-esque appearance.

At the time, much of Har Marís appeal rested in the sheer oddity of his stage show, and there was a definite performance art feel surrounding his music. The musician, born Sean Tillman 35 years ago, still relies on some of his old tricks these days (itís a near-certainty heíll strip down to a pair of tight briefs onstage), but the songs on his latest album, Bye Bye 17, a Motown-influenced song cycle about transitioning to adulthood, could rightfully be described as (gulp) mature. Lizzo opens the show.