Concert preview: Ezra Furman transforms his troubles into fist-pumping anthems

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From the October 10, 2013 edition

“Good music can help you romanticize your problems,” writes Ezra Furman in the liner notes to his most recent album Day of the Dog. The songs populating the record do just that, twisting the singer/songwriter’s dark visions (he sings of biblical plagues, self-sabotage and exploring shadowy byways) into frenetic, pop-punk gems.

Furman’s knack for transforming his troubles into fist-pumping anthems stretches back to his days playing alongside the Harpoons (track down the band’s 2011 album Mysterious Power and blast “I Killed Myself But I Didn’t Die” for proof) and remains undimmed by the passage of time. If anything, songs like “Tell ‘Em All to Go to Hell” cut even deeper, with the singer unburdening himself atop a backdrop of swinging saxophone, loping bass and rockabilly guitar.

[Photos: Music_Preview_EzraFurman_1010]