Alive’s six best acts to catch Saturday at ComFest

  • The DewDroppers
  • Damn the Witch Siren
  • Post Coma Network
  • The Receiver
  • Sleep Fleet
  • The Yeah Babies
From the June 26, 2014 edition

Post Coma Network

12:50 p.m., Bozo Stage

Saturdays at ComFest can make for long days, but it's worth your while to start early with the genre-hopping indie rock of 2014 Alive Band to Watch Post Coma Network. Just stay hydrated. —Brad Keefe

Sleep Fleet

1:40 p.m., Bozo Stage

When these raucous indie revelers hit the main stage, crowds better be ready for a riotous set — imagine a harder, more torrid version of The Strokes. Sleep Fleet has a tight, clean sound with just enough distorted, careening guitar riffs that perfectly slam against Corey Montgomery’s guttural yowl. —Jesse Tigges

The Yeah Babies

4:45 p.m., Offramp Stage

ComFest is historically, woefully, mindbogglingly devoid of hip-hop (or almost any urban music that’s not thrust through a sheen of hippie). The Yeah Babies won't correct that, but they might satisfy that itch just a little, even if the electro-fuzz soul-pop quartet has more in common with Prince than Cyhi the Prynce. —Justin McIntosh

Damn The Witch Siren

5:30 p.m., Offramp Stage

Damn The Witch Siren’s glitter-laden brand of infectious electro-pop, paired with lead singer Krista Kathleen Botjer’s magnetic stage presence is a perfect way to shake your late afternoon beer lull. Botjer and band mate Nathan Photos will transform into Bobbi Kitten and Z Wolf for a bedazzled afternoon rollick that will leave you spellbound. —Abernathy Miller

The DewDroppers

9 p.m., Gazebo Stage

This is a new school Columbus supergroup with members of The Apes, Counterfeit Madison, Skashank Redemption and the New Basics Brass Band, among others. They were supposed to perform during ComFest 2013, but were rained out. That will make this set 12 months in the making, and I expect they’ll show how happy they are to finally play. —Meghan Ralston

The Receiver

9:15 p.m., Offramp Stage

As The Receiver, brothers Casey and Jesse Cooper have a way of making heartache sound absolutely lovely, crafting lush, synth-driven soundscapes that often play counterpoint to Casey’s words. “[I’ll] find new distractions to break the fall,” he sang on one number in a May Double Happiness performance, as the music washed in to cushion his descent. —Andy Downing