Temperance Row Brewing Owner Tony Cabilovski isn't trying to give the finger to the Anti-Saloon League, but given the brewery's name and location, it's hard not to read into it a little bit. The brewery sits in uptown Westerville where early stirrings of Prohibition took root in the 1900s; the League and its publishing arm set up shop in the Columbus suburb in 1909, and from there blanketed the nation with leaflets and fliers opposing the sale and distribution of alcohol.

Temperance Row Brewing Owner Tony Cabilovski isn't trying to give the finger to the Anti-Saloon League, but given the brewery's name and location, it's hard not to read into it a little bit. The brewery sits in uptown Westerville where early stirrings of Prohibition took root in the 1900s; the League and its publishing arm set up shop in the Columbus suburb in 1909, and from there blanketed the nation with leaflets and fliers opposing the sale and distribution of alcohol.

As a further nod to the speakeasys that met Americans' demand to keep drinking during Prohibition, Temperance Row is located in the back of the new Uptown Deli & Brew. Cabilovski said there's a definite transition between the deli and brewery spaces, but the two will function symbiotically. Brewery patrons can wander over to the deli counter for sandwiches to supplement their brews; deli customers can head to the back for a pint or two. The deli is European-style and offers both sit-down and carry-out dining. Guests can also shop for supplies like milk, eggs, deli meats, cheeses and breads.

In addition to Westerville history, Temperance Row draws on another piece of Columbus brewing history, in the form of brewer Scott Francis. Seasoned beer drinkers will recognize his name - the ESB at Barley's still bears his moniker - as he's had a hand in founding Columbus Brewing Company, Barley's, and this year celebrates 40 years owning the Winemaker's Shop in Clintonville. He's taking the reins of Temperance Row's 10-barrel brewing operations alongside his son Alex, who's also found regularly at the shop. Like Barley's before, Francis is starting with mostly English styles like a pale ale, an IPA and a Scottish Ale, but he's planning to work a pilsner in there, too.

Cabilowski is handling the front-of-house for the brewery. He said the deli essentially incorporates the brewery. There's seating on the deli side, but the brewery has a full bar with a pub area seating around 60 and a large patio behind the building. Guests will be welcome to sit anywhere in the space to enjoy their food and beer.