Singer-songwriter Tim Easton isn't prone to fits of nostalgia, so it's almost surprising the musician opted in when his fellow Haynes Boys first debated reuniting for a series of weekend shows, highlighted by an afternoon appearance at ComFest on Sunday, June 28.

Singer-songwriter Tim Easton isn't prone to fits of nostalgia, so it's almost surprising the musician opted in when his fellow Haynes Boys first debated reuniting for a series of weekend shows, highlighted by an afternoon appearance at ComFest on Sunday, June 28.

"I'm not one for looking back, really," said the Nashville-based Easton, 49, who will also join fellow Haynes Boys Jovan Karcic (Gaunt, Scrawl), Aaron Rice (Whiteworst) and Freddie Free (Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments) for a show at Ace of Cups on Friday, June 26, in addition to a Thursday solo gig at Dick's Den where special guests could include any, all or none of the aforementioned. "I didn't have to think about attempting to put out [Haynes Boys' self-titled debut] on vinyl (the 1996 release was recently reissued via Re-Vinyl Records). But attempting to perform the songs again with the guys, yeah, that took a lot of discussion and back and forth because we've all changed and some of us are less nostalgic than others."

This initial apprehension melted away as Easton considered the low stakes - "I don't have any expectations outside of having a good time with friends, and that's a good place to be," he said - and started delving back into the material after ignoring a bulk of it for the better part of two decades.

"I found when I sat down and just went for it the muscle memory kicked in and it wasn't that hard," said Easton, who had continued to perform the Haynes Boys songs "Jackie" and "Bitters Past" in his solo shows, but had lost touch with the rest of the Columbus-based alt-country crew's catalog. "It is only rock 'n' roll, after all. It's really nothing to sweat."

It's this loose, scuffed-up feel Easton appreciated most about the group's sound as he started reacquainting himself with hard-luck tales like "Guardian Angel" and "One Last Question," a bluesy menacer that comes on like the flipside to Old 97's earnest wedding proposal "Question." "I will never hear those goddamn wedding bells," Easton snarls as the guitars rev and purr like a pair of drag-racing motorcycles on the open highway.

"[The music] had that punk attitude. There are noises and stuff flying all around on the album, and today you don't hear that stuff - certainly not on the radio," Easton said. "Today bands are so cleaned up and modified and altered and Pro Tooled to where you miss all the gunk. On old Rolling Stones albums there are all kinds of errant notes and misplaced things, and that was the beauty of it. [Haynes Boys] was a little dirty, and I think it's reflected in those recordings. It's got a bit of an edge to it, and a little rock 'n' roll attitude certainly doesn't hurt."

Other parts of the rock lifestyle, however, Easton has happily left in the past, most notably the alcohol consumption. The frontman said in the band's heyday he was "pretty deep into the sauce, as they say," and he now approaches the material with a sober mind. "Really, I feel like a different person today," he said. "But I can still inhabit that voice. The characters [in the songs] are dark and usually heading for some kind of disaster."

Though the Haynes Boys parted ways after just one album, the band's past isn't similarly littered with wreckage. In fact, according to Easton the group never officially called it a day - "There was never a band meeting where we broke up," he said - and he described the split more as a continental drift than an epic implosion, saying, "I just left town … and it disintegrated."

"I don't have any negative feelings about it; that's just kind of the way it was," he said. "It happens all the time in rock 'n' roll. Being in a band is hard. Four people in a band together? That's four personalities. Four lives. Then even a little success adds massive pressure to it."

Following these weekend shows, expect a similar drift to take place, with Easton resuming his solo career (he's currently writing new material with an eye on a 2016 release) and each band member retreating to his corner of the art world - not that the frontman would be opposed to prolonging the reunion.

"The band doesn't have a plan to go in the studio and make more recordings. It'd be great, and I'd welcome that, but we're not talking that way," he said. "It's very nice to get to play music with my friends again, and I'm super happy we get to do this, but life goes on."