Like the Lawnmower Man or Keanu Reeves in "The Matrix," Fine Animal's sound is steadily morphing, becoming little by little more machine than human.

Like the Lawnmower Man or Keanu Reeves in "The Matrix," Fine Animal's sound is steadily morphing, becoming little by little more machine than human.

The duo's warm, inviting debut, Before the Glow, arrives awash in an assortment of electronic textures, layered with airy synthesizers and padded digital blips and beats. Even the vocals contributed by bandmates Kelan Gilbert and Lucy Oaks have evolved into fodder for these computerized experimentations, occasionally appearing pitch-shifted or smeared across the track in pixelated form, scattered like so many digital Legos.

"Getting deeper into the electronic side, we realized, 'Oh, the voice is also something we can alter and manipulate and edit, and have it dip in and out of that electronic realm,'" said Gilbert, 27, who joined Oaks for a late July interview at an Olde Towne East bar (the pair visits Brothers Drake Meadery for a concert on Friday, Aug. 7). "Even those human elements we like to have, on occasion, become a little less human and more digital sounding."

Part of this evolution stemmed from necessity - drummer KC Wilder departed the group following recording to take a job out-of-country, and rather than replace him the now-duo opted to incorporate programmed drums - while part can be attributed to a long-held interest in electronic music and the sense of freedom inherent in the form.

"If you find a new preset or drum sound it's like 'Oh, we have this at our disposal now,' and if we had a live drummer he might be like, 'I can't play that; I don't even know what the hell that is," Gilbert said. "It's liberating because we have this unlimited freedom to explore and embrace any sound we choose."

Of course, this sense of limitless possibility comes with its own set of drawbacks - namely buggy tech.

"If you're relying on a computer, computers crash sometimes, and you have to prepare yourself," said Gilbert, who first met Oaks in 2012 when she auditioned for what he envisioned as a more rock-oriented project at the time (the two first dueted on Jack White's "Love Interruption"). "We have these situational drills, like, 'Alright, if something crashes this is what we'll do. We have to reboot everything in this order, and you tell a joke, and we'll act like nothing's going on.' We try to prepare for the worst, but for the most part it's fairly reliable. We've learned how to coexist."