Wildhoney's music tends to evoke a dreamlike quality in line with the title of its full-length debut, Sleep Through It, building on hazy oceans of guitar and singer Lauren Shusterich's warm, velvet-soft vocals, which cut through the surrounding noise like high beams on an darkened country road.

Wildhoney's music tends to evoke a dreamlike quality in line with the title of its full-length debut, Sleep Through It, building on hazy oceans of guitar and singer Lauren Shusterich's warm, velvet-soft vocals, which cut through the surrounding noise like high beams on an darkened country road.

It's an escapist quality guitarist Joe Trainor attributes, at least in part, to the harsh realities that often go hand-in-hand with living and working in Baltimore, the band's hometown.

"I think there's a certain escapism that comes from living in the city we live in. Baltimore is a hard city, and there are a lot of injustices there," said Trainor, who joins Shusterich, Alan Everhart (bass), Nathan O'Dell (guitar) and Zach Inscho (drums) for a concert at Ace of Cups on Tuesday, Nov. 24. "When you play this sort of music you can get lost in it, and you turn your brain off and become one with what you're doing as opposed to thinking of all these other things that are happening, whether they're personal or global. When we play a show … we turn everything else off and lose ourselves in what we're doing for those 25 minutes, or whatever it is."

Though the songs on Sleep Through It could be classified as shoegaze, and Trainor acknowledged the bandmates are fans of similarly immersive, guitar-driven acts like My Bloody Valentine and Ride - "Just like everyone else," he said - the musicians further credit their wall-of-sound approach to groups like the Beach Boys and Phil Spector's famed 1960s production work.

"They're not distorted and aggressive in the way we are, but it's still … building this world you can immerse yourself in," he said.

More than anything, however, Trainor, who described himself as creatively restless, believes Wildhoney's debut merely depicts one stage in what he views as an ongoing musical evolution.

"At first the band was as alienatingly loud as possible, and there wasn't any focus on letting the vocals be at the forefront," said Trainor, who grew up playing punk and hardcore and has only recently learned to pull back, writing songs steeped in depression, anxiety and uncertainty rather than anger, as he explained it. "As time has gone by we've … tried to let the vocals speak more than the abrasiveness of the guitars."

The guitarist sees this trend continuing on future albums, noting the songs the band has started sketching out in recent times fall among its prettiest, most musically diverse efforts to date.

"With the EP we just released [Your Face Sideways] we feel like it's the end of one era of Wildhoney," Trainor said. "I think Lauren will have a bigger influence on the next LP because she's playing guitar on some of the songs, and there's interest in incorporating more orchestral arrangements - using strings and horns to extend our palette. We're not interested in being stuck in that shoegaze world."

Ace of Cups

8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24

2619 N. High St., Old North

aceofcupsbar.com

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