A group of four guys seated together at Colin's Coffee in Upper Arlington are filling the place with their conversation, their laughter becoming contagious. This is what counts as a meeting for Columbus music veterans Mark Dantzer, Pat Buzzard, Chuck Johnson and Ryan Smith, who are discussing a new book for their podcast, the Rock and Roll Book Club.

A group of four guys seated together at Colin's Coffee in Upper Arlington are filling the place with their conversation, their laughter becoming contagious. This is what counts as a meeting for Columbus music veterans Mark Dantzer, Pat Buzzard, Chuck Johnson and Ryan Smith, who are discussing a new book for their podcast, the Rock and Roll Book Club.

"It's really hard to find four people with chemistry, coming at a same subject from all different sides," said Mark Danzter, a longtime radio DJ and founder of the Rock and Roll Book Club. "We really lucked into that."

The book club started out as just an excuse to get together with friends and talk about something they all loved and had in common. "I wanted to hang out with other music guys, but I was at an age where I didn't want to go to a bar and stay up till 1 a.m. to see a band," Danzter said. "That wasn't my life anymore."

After about a year, the members tossed around the idea of making the club into a podcast and uploaded their first show in November 2014. To their surprise, the show caught on with listeners.

"It's just an eclectic mix of people," said Chuck Johnson, an educator and entertainer. "We are just all so different. We are all into different things and we all have different opinions on everything. It makes for a good dynamic."

And an eclectic group it is. Each person brings a different personality to the discussion. Their hilariously sarcastic banter will have your stomach twisting with laughter.

"My rule for myself was to only do this if it's fun," Dantzer said. "If something starts to not be fun, then don't go in that direction. That's still kinda the main guiding thing."

The 30-minute show airs once a month from Johnson's basement and features discussions on a "trashy rockstar bio" that the members rotate choosing.

"There's a lot of deliberation when you're picking your book," said Buzzard, a founding member of Saving Jane. "We argue that we would like to do more, but we just can't read fast enough. Pat Buzzard here, slow reader," Buzzard laughed.

"Yeah, and if you're Ryan, make sure it's less than 150 pages," Dantzer jokingly adds.

The show opens with a catchy theme song that was written and recorded by the members and ends with a 12-song playlist, influenced by the chosen literature.

"We try to go through the musical journey with the book," Buzzard said. "We sample some of the songs so you can see where the music came from. A lot of it is so eye-opening. You can totally see that one step lead to another step, to another step, and that's how you ended up with Kiss."

The Rock and Roll Book Club will perform their first live taping of the podcast at the Upper Arlington Public Library on Tuesday, Jan. 26. They'll discuss "Hitless Wonder: A Life In Minor League Rock And Roll," by Joe Oestreich, bassist and vocalist in Watershed, a band he co-founded with Colin Gawel, who also owns Colin's Coffee and who'll perform live at the event. Oesterich will do a call-in Q&A with the audience via Skype after the podcasters discuss the book.

"I'm excited to see the live show work out because I think there is a real potential to take it to other libraries and share the gospel of rock 'n' roll literature," Buzzard said. "I would like to see the podcast listenership continue to grow and from that we could spin off the live show that we take to the people." Buzzard pauses, laughs and continues. "Take the show to the streets."

"As long as people are willing to listen, we will continue to make shows for them," Ryan Smith, singer and songwriter added.

"Ryan Smith, shooting for the stars," Buzzard cracked.