Jangly garage-pop quartet Fizzed selected a suitable name, considering its music generally arrives awash in layers of feedback that can make songs hiss like fresh-shaken sodas.

Jangly garage-pop quartet Fizzed selected a suitable name, considering its music generally arrives awash in layers of feedback that can make songs hiss like fresh-shaken sodas.

Early in the band's existence, singer and guitarist Christian Pierce employed this obscuring layer purposefully, wearing the fuzz like sonic armor to mask his discomfort with his voice.

"The main reason I never branched out to start a band before is because I felt inferior vocally. I didn't think my voice was strong enough to put forward as a singer - I wouldn't even sing in the car around my wife - and I didn't want to pen songs for somebody else because that didn't feel natural to me," said Pierce, who logged time as a drummer in myriad bands, including the late, loved Tough and Lovely, before stepping into a frontman role with Fizzed roughly a year ago. "But I'm at a point now where I'm comfortable, and I'm using [reverb] the way I want to."

Pierce initially started writing and recording songs at home to counter the frustration he experienced playing drums in a handful of groups that never quite took root.

"I had been in a couple bands that had crumbled, and I knew I could count on myself," said Pierce, who joins his bandmates for a concert at Ace of Cups on Friday, April 1. "I'm 36 now, and I could have done this when I was 22, but I never did. I moved here [from Orient, Ohio] and I was instantly playing drums in bands, and I was known as a drummer. And that was enough for a time."

Despite Pierce's initial discomfort with vocals, the transition to center stage was a relatively seamless one - "I'm pretty much in my element performing for people," he said - and on recent songs he's even revealed more of his natural singing voice, stripping away layers of painted-on noise to expose the original finish beneath.

"I'm opening up and feeling more comfortable with my voice. We have a new song we're playing [at Ace of Cups], and it has some reverb on it, but it's a little more natural sounding, I guess," said the Euclid-raised Pierce, who got his start in music thumping on buckets in his father's workshop before receiving his first drum kit at age 14. "I'd never played guitar in a band, or sang in a band and written songs for a band, so each thing we do is new ground for me. Everything is evolving as it goes."