Here are the three rules of improv as established by the Commune, the fictional improv troupe in Mike Birbiglia's "Don't Think Twice," one of the funniest, warmest and best movies of the year:

Here are the three rules of improv as established by the Commune, the fictional improv troupe in Mike Birbiglia's "Don't Think Twice," one of the funniest, warmest and best movies of the year:

1. Say yes.

2. It's all about the group.

3. Don't think.

Birbiglia plays Miles, the founding member of the Commune who has toiled teaching others the art form despite being "inches" away from landing a spot on the TV show "Weekend Live" (a thinly veiled reference to SNL) years prior.

Other members of the Commune include Samantha (Gillian Jacobs), a one-time fan who is living her dream now as a member. Then there's her boyfriend Jack (Keegan-Michael Key), who's got talent both comedic and self-promotional.

Bill (Chris Gethard) is working as hard at his writing as he is not to disappoint his father. Allison (Kate Micucci) is expressing herself as a way to continue to push her true passion for drawing to the back burner. And constant pot-smoker Lindsay (Tami Sagher) is living the cliché by living with her parents.

The Commune's cult following doesn't exactly pay the bills, and its members live the classic lives of struggling New York City artists. When one member does get an introduction to the success they've all dreamed of, rifts threaten the troupe.

"Don't Think Twice" is a sendup of improv comedy tropes (troupe tropes?), yes, but every second of it is done with love.

In fact, the whole movie is a relatable love letter to that moment where the idea of following your dreams starts to come into question. "I feel like your 20s are all about hope," says Miles. "And then your 30s are all about how dumb it was to hope."

It's also very, very, very funny. It's not a parody of improv, it's some actual bust-a-gut funny stuff from an amazingly talented cast. Key mixes funny with complex emotions. Between this and her work on the Netflix series "Love," I think it's overdue to praise Jacobs' combined comedic-dramatic talents.

And Birbiglia follows up his intensely personal first movie "Sleepwalk With Me" with another loving take on the ups and downs of the business of making people laugh. This is a leap forward for him as a filmmaker. It's layered, heartfelt and manages to make the whole ensemble feel like real people.

To repeat, "Don't Think Twice" isn't just one of the best comedies of the year. It's one of the best movies. It's time that people appreciate what great comedy takes, including maybe the Academy? Hint, hint.