On Oct. 11, anti-Trump messaging appeared on an e-billboard at the corner of Third and Spring streets Downtown. Paid for by prochoicecats.com, a cat-themed business supporting abortion rights, the billboard features a cat version of the presidential candidate and encourages viewers to "Dump the Trump into your litter box." Another says, "Dear Trump, don't grab my," followed by a cat emoji.

On Oct. 11, anti-Trump messaging appeared on an e-billboard at the corner of Third and Spring streets Downtown. Paid for by prochoicecats.com, a cat-themed business supporting abortion rights, the billboard features a cat version of the presidential candidate and encourages viewers to "Dump the Trump into your litter box." Another says, "Dear Trump, don't grab my," followed by a cat emoji.

The latter references a lewd statement Donald Trump made in a 2005 "Access Hollywood" video, which first surfaced publicly in early October. Prochoicecats.com creator Amanda Patton already had an anti-Trump e-billboard campaign planned to begin on Oct. 17, but hadn't decided on the art or messaging. The interview footage prompted her to re-sign the contract and fast track the billboard, which will remain on display through Oct. 31 [update: in late October Patton informed Alive that she has received enough donations to keep the billboard up through Nov. 6].

"We just want to shame this man and bring attention to the fact that he's not good for women," Patton said.

Patton founded prochoicecats.com in 2015 to raise money for a digital billboard promoting the Founder's Women's Health Center, where she worked as a patient advocate. The site sells shirts, tampon-shaped cat toys and other merchandise, much of which features her cat, Boo Radley.

"I thought it was gonna be over, and then people really encouraged me to do another set of billboards," said Patton, who works with artists and other partners to create the prochoicecats.com products and billboards.

She decided to focus on Trump "and not some of the other really anti-choice legislators operating here at our Statehouse," she said, and criticized some of the regulations that she feels make it difficult for women to access and afford abortions in Ohio. "There were so many of those names I could have thrown out … but it just felt really appropriate to use [Trump] just because of how uninformed he is and yet how staunchly pro-life he is."

Most of the feedback has been positive, said Patton who received 60 email responses in the 24 to 48 hours after the billboard went live. "I've had a few that were like, 'Hey, I had an abortion and I appreciate what you're doing,'" Patton said. "Those are the ones that stick with me the most. … Other people are like, 'Oh yeah, I'm pro-choice, I love cats, this is awesome.'"

Patton said she is unsure of the future of prochoicecats.com, a labor of love that is costly and time-consuming. However, she believes she has honored her customers and donors with the billboard, and may have even made an impression on Trump himself when he held a private event in Columbus earlier this month.

"My theory is he has to have driven past it on his way from the airport to the Renaissance [Hotel]," Patton said. "He was a couple blocks from this billboard. That was pretty rad."