Since this week's cover story is all about local podcasts, we thought we'd highlight some of our favorite non-local podcasts. A quick caveat: I love a good story, so most of the podcasts you'll find here have more of a journo bent and less of a let's-shoot-the-breeze-in-my-basement-and-record-it vibe.

Since this week's cover story is all about local podcasts, we thought we'd highlight some of our favorite non-local podcasts. A quick caveat: I love a good story, so most of the podcasts you'll find here have more of a journo bent and less of a let's-shoot-the-breeze-in-my-basement-and-record-it vibe.

"Fresh Air"

The diverse range of guests interviewed by longtime public-radio pro Terry Gross keeps this daily podcast engaging and relevant.

"Heavyweight"

A new one from Alex Blumberg's burgeoning Gimlet Media empire, "Heavyweight" features longtime podcaster Jonathan Goldstein accompanying his friends on journeys to turning points from their pasts. Hilarious and poignant.

"The Longform Podcast"

If you're a magazine junkie, this weekly interview show with the best longform writers in the biz is tops.

"Mystery Show"

Probably the best podcast to ever get canceled, "Mystery Show" followed the inimitable Starlee Kine as she embarked on quests to discover the true height of Jake Gyllenhaal and the origin of a breakfast-themed belt buckle.

"Radiolab"

A trailblazer in the podcast-as-storytelling medium with hyper-produced sound design, this WNYC podcast delves into the human condition under the guise of science journalism.

"Reply All"

Another Gimlet Media property, "Reply All" is "a show about the internet," but only because the stories originate in the online realm. Hosted by PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman, it's currently my favorite podcast. Recent episode "Boy in Photo" is a good place to start.

"Revisionist History"

This new podcast from Malcolm Gladwell (author of The Tipping Point, Blink and other best-sellers) reinterprets events, people and ideas of the past, which is more interesting than it sounds.

"Serial"

If you know anything about podcasts, you know about "Serial." A true-crime spin-off of "This American Life," the first season of "Serial" found host Sarah Koenig digging into the little-known case of Baltimore's Adnan Syed, who was imprisoned for killing Hae Min Lee in 1999. "Serial's" underrated second season explored the case of Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl.

Slate's "Culture Gabfest"

"Culture Gabfest" is one of the few conversational, non-comedy podcasts I consistently enjoy. Slate's critics are quick-witted, smart thinkers, and they avoid Slate.com's increasingly annoying hot takes that are often contrarian for the sake of being contrarian.

"Song Exploder"

The ultimate "Behind the Music," "Song Exploder's" weekly episode deconstructs a song with the musician who wrote it, revealing fascinating tidbits you'd never know otherwise.

"StartUp"

"StartUp's" first season, in which Gimlet Media founder Alex Blumberg makes a podcast about building a podcast company (meta!), is still the best.

"This American Life"

Ira Glass' long-running radio show ("Each week we choose a theme and bring you a variety of different kinds of stories on that theme," Glass often says) is the crown jewel of storytelling podcasts and is consistently No. 1 on the iTunes chart.