The only Columbus Watershed show of 2016 comes at the tail end of the year as the long-running rock 'n' roll foursome releases its first bit of new music since 2012. Originally available only through Kickstarter, the fourth volume in the Watershed single series features new songs "Best Worst Night" and "Hey Lydia," plus six bonus tracks of live cuts and outtakes, the background of which will ring a bell if you've read Watershed singer/bassist Joe Oestreich's excellent book Hitless Wonder, which chronicles the ups and downs in the beloved local band's rollercoaster career.

The only Columbus Watershed show of 2016 comes at the tail end of the year as the long-running rock 'n' roll foursome releases its first bit of new music since 2012. Originally available only through Kickstarter, the fourth volume in the Watershed single series features new songs "Best Worst Night" and "Hey Lydia," plus six bonus tracks of live cuts and outtakes, the background of which will ring a bell if you've read Watershed singer/bassist Joe Oestreich's excellent book Hitless Wonder, which chronicles the ups and downs in the beloved local band's rollercoaster career.

But don't overlook this bill's undercard: Cleveland power-pop act Paranoid Lovesick, playing only its second show in the past decade. After a period of major-label buzz in the mid '90s, Paranoid Lovesick opened for bands like Oasis and Weezer. But the buzz never hit a fever pitch, despite the band's multiple songwriters penning some of the catchiest pop-rock tunes to originate on the Lake Erie coast since Bill Fox's the Mice.

Paranoid Lovesick pressed on (not unlike its pals in Watershed) before going on hiatus in 2002. But just before the band planned to regroup and finish its long-in-the-works album, Suburban Pop Allegro, in 2003, lead guitarist Rick McBrien died of a heart attack.

Now, a reformed Paranoid Lovesick, featuring singer/guitarist Bill Stone, bassist/singer Todd Thurman, guitarist/singer Chip Ficyk and drummer John Potwora, will take the stage for the first time in several years. To get ready, fans of Teenage Fanclub and Big Star should check out Suburban Pop Allegro on streaming services. A track like "Feelin' Alright to Drive" will make you wonder why the band never made it big and also make you grateful Watershed convinced these guys to drive down I-71 one more time. (Don't miss it)