Back in 2004, just before the reelection of George W. Bush, long-running Midwestern indie-rock act Poster Children released On the Offensive, a six-song EP of politically charged covers, including the Clash's "Clampdown" and Heaven 17's "(We Don't Need This) Fascist Groove Thang."

Back in 2004, just before the reelection of George W. Bush, long-running Midwestern indie-rock act Poster Children released On the Offensive, a six-song EP of politically charged covers, including the Clash's "Clampdown" and Heaven 17's "(We Don't Need This) Fascist Groove Thang."

"That EP, the whole point of it in 2004 was to show that all these songs from the early 1980s when Reagan first came into power were still relevant in the election year of 2004. Now, in 2016, that becomes relevant again," said Poster Children singer Rick Valentin in a recent phone call. "It's kinda depressing. … I started listening to the songs, and I was like, 'Wow, things haven't changed that much.'"

On the Offensive was by no means Poster Children's first foray into politics. Earlier in 2004, the band released the post-punk LP No More Songs About Sleep and Fire, and on track "The Leader," Valentin unleashes a scathing, biting indictment. "The Leader knows what's best for the rest of us / Citizens, you must trust the leader," Valentin sings. "He lies / We know he lies / We love the lies / We need the lies / He lies!"

"Sometimes when I do political lyrics I'm like, 'Ah, this isn't gonna age well. It's gonna go past its due date fairly quickly.' But ['The Leader'] is altogether too appropriate once again - even more so," Valentin said. "It seemed at the time to be a really, really extreme, in-your-face kind of thing, and now, listening back to the song, it's a little ahead of the curve."

While Valentin is more apt to lament external, societal woes in his songs, 1991's Daisychain Reaction was more abstract and relationship-driven. Recorded by Steve Albini, Daisychain became the first in a series of major-label releases for Poster Children, which Valentin co-founded with bassist/vocalist Rose Marshack in 1987. While mainstream success wasn't in the cards ("If You See Kay" was a minor hit on MTV), Daisychain's pre-grunge, Jawbox-meets-Pavement soundholds up remarkably well after 25 years - so much so that Poster Children recently reissued a remastered vinyl version of the album.

The band's setlists on the current tour, which will stop at the Big Room Bar on Sunday, Nov. 20, draws heavily from Daisychain. When not on tour, Valentin and Marshack spend much of their time raising two boys, ages 7 and 13, and teaching in the arts technology program at Illinois State University.

Meanwhile, Valentin is dealing with the political events of today in the only we he knows how: by writing songs (Poster Children has already recorded six tracks with Albini for a new full-length) and by playing shows. "I process it by playing very loud guitar in a band and I scream at people," Valentin said. "What better way is there to process this kind of stuff than to play loud punk rock, indie rock or whatever in a small room and have a whole bunch of people purging along with you?"