Concert engages, teaches audiences about music

Naked Classics is not a lesson in music history or music theory, although it offers both of those things.

The stars of these concerts presented by ProMusica Chamber Orchestra with Scottish musicologist/educator/composer Paul Rissmann, are the music and the musicians. What Rissmann does in unpacking some of the musical ideas within the composition is designed to enhance, rather than usurp, that star status.

“It's entertainment — a full concert experience,” said ProMusica Music Director David Danzmayr. “It's not a lecture. It's not (makes snoring sound). Come and be entertained, and we give you something else, too.”

“Uncovering the beauty in the music and how the orchestra functions, and getting an audience curious about how music works” are Rissmann's prime concerns, the composer said in a phone interview. To this end, he's not afraid to use musical terminology or to engage the audience in singing or clapping to illustrate a point.

Schubert's “Symphony No. 10” was extrapolated from recently discovered piano sketches by composer and Schubert-expert Brian Newbould. This will mark one of the first performances of the work in the United States.

“I have to bring this piece to the audience,” Danzmayr said. “I like to think Schubert left this work unfinished so ProMusica could do it on Naked Classics.”