As Sam Beam changes, his voice remains

Amid the unending white noise of these times, it is hard to remember the sort of world that could have birthed the likes of Sam Beam. Of all the four-track Southern troubadours at the turn of this century, and all the English Lit majors who knew just enough guitar chords to think better of themselves, Beam's voice is one of the few that harpooned many hearts. Warm, but rarely giving, it was that voice that caused so many to fall in love with Iron & Wine. It was as if you were listening to his heart through the crack of the bedroom door, crippled with beauty and longing and need, and at times nearly overwhelmed by its own abstract stories to tell.

Beam never had to write a song for you, because if you listened hard enough, you could imagine the world of Iron & Wine as your own. Those evenings of choking up to The Creek Drank the Cradle are long gone, and Beam has grown into his britches, expanding his songwriting palette to include collaborations with the likes of Calexico and Band of Horses. Yet, still, there is that voice, and the weight of the worlds in the head and heart behind it. (Don't miss it)