The theater production emphasizes fundamental humanity of 'Macbeth'

Columbus Civic Theater Artistic Director Richard Albert thinks it's silly, the superstition among theater types to not mention the title of Shakespeare's tragedy “Macbeth,” instead referring to it as “that Scottish play.” The title isn't cursed, Albert insists, and company members are free to say the title aloud … after which he crosses himself and grips a rabbit's foot. (Not really.)

Superstition (and post-Halloween witchy-ness) aside, it's the timeless good-vs-evil plot and rich, quotable script (“Is this a dagger which I see before me”; “Out, damned spot”; “Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow”) that make “Macbeth” a standout, even among the works of the Bard, according to Albert.

“It's a dark play, but good wins out in the end. The Macbeths suffer endlessly after they commit their crime,” Albert said. “The amount of torment they go through for an amoral act, you almost feel sorry for them.”

Which is ultimately what Macbeth is about. There is a resonance for us, living in the current political climate, to the notion of power at all costs, Albert said, but the play's fundamental humanity is what makes “Macbeth” truly timeless.