Sadly, this week's major release, "10 Cloverfield Lane," screens for critics too late for Alive's deadline. I say "sadly" because of one of the names attached to it: J.J. Abrams.

Sadly, this week's major release, "10 Cloverfield Lane," screens for critics too late for Alive's deadline. I say "sadly" because of one of the names attached to it: J.J. Abrams.

Abrams is merely a producer on the sort-of sequel to "Cloverfield," but his track record means that that's still cause for attention - much like Steven Spielberg in his prime. Here's a refresher on why Abrams' name means so much.

"Felicity" (1998)

Yep, the reigning king of nerd culture was co-creator of the TV series that chronicled the romantic and life dilemmas of a young woman headed to college. It was also pretty smart and featured some great character arcs.

"Armageddon" (1998)

This one is not really a feather in Abrams' cap, thanks to the typically ham-fisted direction of Michael Bay, but it was written by Abrams and showed his future knack for a blockbuster. Fortunately, they got a lot better.

"Alias" (2001)

Abrams second TV series showed more of his knack for a strong female leads and those OMG twists.

"Lost" (2004)

Forget the naysayers who said it didn't stick the landing. "Lost" was landmark television along the lines of "Twin Peaks."

"Mission Impossible III" (2006)

Abrams' feature film debut established a pattern of him bringing an existing franchise to new heights. You'll see more of that later.

"Cloverfield" (2008)

Abrams produced this found-footage monster movie, which built mystery and hype in the weeks leading up to its release. It was one from Spielberg's "Jaws" playbook.

"Fringe" (2008)

Another Abrams' co-created TV show that defied the odds. Fans who missed "The X-Files" rejoiced … and this was better than Fox's recent return of that series.

"Star Trek" (2009)

A reboot of a sci-fi staple with a rabid fan base, Abrams injected levels of thrill and excitement that took "Trek" to audiences beyond Trekkies.

"Super 8" (2011)

This came out the same year as Abrams' second solid "Mission: Impossible" film, but it was more personal - a throwback to the kid-adventure movies of Spielberg's heyday (even if it wasn't quite that).

"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" (2015)

Maybe you've heard of it? The residual disappointment of George Lucas' prequel trilogy vanished in two magical hours that reminded everyone why we loved this story in the first place. Abrams is still overseeing the coming sequels, even if he's not in the director's chair.