Click here for a photo gallery from the RJD2 show.

Friday's RJD2 concert in the Wexner Center Performance Space was at times invigorating and at times frustrating. The ace DJ showed that he's still most at home behind the decks, and his new Columbus all-star band needs some more practice to realize its formidible potential, but in the moments when the musicians clicked, RJ's desire to try his hand as a singer-songwriter was charmingly validated.

Click here for a photo gallery from the RJD2 show.

Friday's RJD2 concert in the Wexner Center Performance Space was at times invigorating and at times frustrating. The ace DJ showed that he's still most at home behind the decks, and his new Columbus all-star band needs some more practice to realize its formidible potential, but in the moments when the musicians clicked, RJ's desire to try his hand as a singer-songwriter was charmingly validated.

Still, the show left plenty of room for improvement. Derek DiCenzo, Happy Chichester and Sam Brown are three extremely talented musicians, but they just didn't seem together after a few weekends of rehearsal with RJ. Each had his shining moments, though, especially Brown, who made a case for himself as the city's top drummer with his steady, inventive playing. As folks mentioned at donewaiting.com, it would be nice if the band would come back to finish the tour in Columbus so we could see its progress. (I, for one, am looking forward to catching the show at SXSW in Austin this week to see what progress has been made.)

The set began promisingly with solid versions of "Since We Last Spoke" and "You Never Had It So Good." The rest of the opening sequence was mostly shaky, especially a live rendition of "Ghostwriter" with RJ on turntables and mixer. His clumsy handling of the climactic horn sample dampened the song's affect. A few songs later, the band departed, and RJ returned to the wheels of steel, where he showed off his expertise. Now that the musicians didn't have to stop to switch instruments between every song, the show should have picked up momentum with RJ in his comfort zone. Instead, this is when the energy really started to peter out. Perhaps the turntablism would have been rad in another context, but after hearing Sam Brown play drums, spinning records seems kind of weak.

Although the new The Third Hand has taken some critical beatings, those songs accounted for most of the highlights, and RJ's maligned voice held up quite well, especially with Chichester's backup vocals as a safety net. After RJ's DJ set, the band returned and started to come together beautifully, displaying awesome chemistry on songs such as "Work It Out" and "Have Mercy." And though "Ghostwriter" was an early fumble, RJ and crew were at the peak of their powers down the stretch when the band played and he manned the decks. The thumping "Laws of the Gods" and especially the shrieking sirens of set closer "The Horror" made for the night's most enthralling minutes. Incredibly, RJ and company took me from checking my watch during the dragging middle section to thinking "It's already over?" by the time they were done.

All in all, not a bad first night, but the set could use a little trimming, the band needs a little more time to get a feel for each other, and those guys need to find a way to transition more effectively to keep up the flow of the show. Not every crowd will be as patient as the hometown flock.