South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone use many visual techniques to augment their topical satire, but often overlooked is their keen ear for pop music and its ability to twist a scene into hilariously inappropriate directions.

Plenty of original songs, dance numbers and musical spoofs sung by nearly every main character gives the film a certain grace. I especially like how they integrate the best and worst hits of our time.

This is one reason, my friends, why the show rocks. Literally.

Wikipedia has an exhaustive list of songs used in the show, and I fondly reminisced about the many appearances of great tunes in strange places.

Below is my favorite from each season. The first person to email me their favorite music moment of this genius show will win a free CD.

Enjoy!

South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone use many visual techniques to augment their topical satire, but often overlooked is their keen ear for pop music and its ability to twist a scene into hilariously inappropriate directions.

Plenty of original songs, dance numbers and musical spoofs sung by nearly every main character gives the film a certain grace. I especially like how they integrate the best and worst hits of our time.

This is one reason, my friends, why the show rocks. Literally.

Wikipedia has an exhaustive list of songs used in the show, and I fondly reminisced about the many appearances of great tunes in strange places.

Below is my favorite from each season. The first person to email me their favorite music moment of this genius show will win a free CD.

Enjoy!

Season One: Minnie Ripperton, “Loving You”

John Stamos’ brother Richard plans to cover this classic tune during halftime of the boys’ football game. To fix the game, Jimbo and Ned rig a bomb set to detonate when Stamos hits the notoriously high C note. Unfortunately, he can’t emote like Ripperton. The boys lose the game, and the hunting duo loses huge dollars.

Season Two: The Monkees, “I’m a Believer”

When the boys find out that their parents deliberately gave them chickenpox, they hire Old Frieda, a local hooker, to give their parents herpes. She uses their toothbrushes, spits into their orange juice and does other nasty things while this jaunty pop tune plays gleefully in the background.

Season Three: Dio, “Holy Diver”

Ronnie James and crew play the South Park Bay of Pigs Memorial Dance at the local elementary school. Kyle turns home-schooled kid Rebecca into a raging floozy, a fight breaks out, things are mended, and this song begins. Everyone dances. Dio looks awful.

Season Four: Traditional, “The Hukilau Song”

Walter Matthau, Frank Sinatra, JFK Jr. and other stars join Satan in a luau, complete with festive Hawaiian stylings. A version of this traditional hula song (possibly one by island great Hal Aloma) plays in the background. Soon after, Matthau asks Satan to join them for drinks, but the Dark Lord declines because he has to organize his new condo with Chris.

Season Five: Lipps Inc., “Funkytown”

Stoner WMD Towelie attempts to break into a secret government base by entering an access code stored in his memory banks. However, when he punches the tones, he finds only the beat to this catchy ‘80s classic. “Hey,” the distracted, red-eyed cloth soon says, “that’s the melody to ‘Funkytown.’”

Season Six: Elvis Presley, “In the Ghetto”

Cartman has Kenny’s soul trapped inside his body, since he drank his ashes thinking they were chocolate-milk mix. He begins to have freak experiences of the past, and one takes him to a random encounter: Cartman teasing poor Kenny again and again with this white-eyed soul classic.

Season Seven: Paula Cole, “I Don’t Want to Wait”

In the show’s best-ever flashback, Cartman is transported to the colonial days. In order to learn more about the Declaration of Independence, he kills a messenger boy with a nearby piece of firewood, nonchalantly singing this - the theme song of Dawson’s Creek.

Season Eight: Billy Ray Cyrus, “Achy, Breaky Heart”

Stan got “served” when a rival breakdance gang comes to town looking for trouble. Hearing of Stan’s refusal to dance back, Randy Marsh takes him into the garage and shows him how to get down to the second most annoying and un-hip country song blasted throughout the ‘90s (behind “Electric Slide,” of course).

Season Nine: Baha Men, “Who Let the Dogs Out”

The boys start a talent agency, eventually taking a Chinese woman named Wing to California with hopes of making it big. After many failures, Sylvester Stallone wants Wing to sing at his daughter’s wedding. Hearing the news, the boys drop everything, dance around and do an a cappella version of this club hit.

Season Ten: The Starland Vocal Band, “Afternoon Delight”

Stan’s brother, kindergarten student Ike, begins a hot affair with his teacher, and the two are often pictured together, bathing blissfully. This song, also featured in Anchorman, accompanies their lovemaking.