For whatever reason, last year's "Sharknado" became a surprising success - compared to other terrible Syfy movies like "Megapython vs. Gatoroid" or "Sharktopus" - so now there's a sequel. If you saw the first "Sharknado," you pretty much know what to expect this time around; terrible writing (for the plot, but especially the dialog), laughable acting and atrocious special effects.

For whatever reason, last year’s “Sharknado” became a surprising success — compared to other terrible Syfy movies like “Megapython vs. Gatoroid” or “Sharktopus” — so now there’s a sequel. If you saw the first “Sharknado,” you pretty much know what to expect this time around; terrible writing (for the plot, but especially the dialog), laughable acting and atrocious special effects.

Since the idea of a tornado that sucks up and spits out sharks makes complete sense scientifically, another sharknado happens — this time in New York City (a tornado hotbed much like Los Angeles in the first film). The shark action comes pretty quickly here with our heroes Fin (Ian Ziering) and April (Tara Reid) flying to New York when their plane unexpectedly converges with, you guessed it, a sharknado. The plane is ransacked, and we’re on our way.

What follows is purely some of the stupidest action ever captured on film. People say and do dumb things while sharks whiz around maiming and eating people. (Although, much like to original, more people die from sharks just falling out of the sky and flattening them into a pile of bloody goo.)

The one notable difference in “Sharknado 2” is the amount of well-known faces that pop up. The cast includes Matt Lauer, Al Roker, Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan playing themselves, as well as B-movie starlet Kari Wuhrer, a surely down-on-her luck Vivica A. Fox and imitable douche Mark McGrath. Hell, even Biz Markie and Judah Friedlander have cameos.

Does any of this add up to something worth watching? Not really. I actually enjoyed the first movie, partly because I have an affinity for bad movies, but also because it had the charming appeal of being awful, but you could tell it was an earnest attempt.

Now that “Sharknado” has found a cult following (and mild success) with its badness, the goal here was to intentionally make a terrible movie. It means all the fun from the first one has been completely sucked out in the sequel.

Photo courtesy Syfy