The upcoming exhibit, "Impressed: An Ohio Based Printmakers Show," at Tacocat Cooperative in Grandview brings together printmakers from all across Ohio to present the many styles, techniques and concepts the medium has to offer. Nearly 20 artists are showcasing (mostly smaller-sized) pieces that represent the range of printmaking.

The upcoming exhibit, “Impressed: An Ohio Based Printmakers Show,” at Tacocat Cooperative in Grandview brings together printmakers from all across Ohio to present the many styles, techniques and concepts the medium has to offer. Nearly 20 artists are showcasing (mostly smaller-sized) pieces that represent the range of printmaking.

“I wanted to get as wide a breadth of print disciplines represented to show a nice survey of what the medium has to offer,” said printmaker and educator Blake Sanders, who curated the exhibit with fellow printmaker/educator Michael Weigman. “You’ve got many techniques; the straightforward black-and-white woodcuts and really dense calligraphs, almost photo-realistic pieces [and] visually inspired screen-prints. There is a little bit of everything, so there are as many areas of access for the audience as possible.”

Sanders took to curating “Impressed” with an eye toward diversity, inviting printmaking veterans as well as those new to the form.

“I worked to get a nice mix of young up-and-coming [artists] — some of them are students who’ve just graduated — and then a handful are more established artists, too. Some of them were recent students of mine at Bowling Green (where Sanders had been an instructor before moving to Missouri recently), and then we’ve got people like Art Werger and Karla Hackenmiller (whose piece “Yartsa Gunbu Ti Dian” is pictured) from Ohio University that are really well-respected in the field,” Sanders said.

The goal of incorporating so many styles and levels of experience in “Impressed” is to make the exhibit accessible to all, no matter the viewer’s background or knowledge of printmaking specifically, or the art world as a whole. Sanders feels printmaking is already a welcoming art form given its nature, and this show only hopes to foster that.

“I want to spread the gospel of printmaking. There seems to be an increasing disconnect between contemporary art and the general public. I find that printmaking is a really good avenue, a really good in for the public because it can be so inclusive,” Sanders said.

“Impressed” will have an opening reception 6-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7.

Karla Hackenmiller photo