"Pie is the food of the heroic," it says on the snazzy website of Dough Mama Pie & Pastry, a fantastic new source of wedge-sliced delights. That wise quote is attributed to a New York Times editorial from 1902, but it could've come from M.F.K. Fisher, Kierkegaard, Zhuangzi, or some other underappreciated genius. Anyway, now that it's Holiday Pie Season, it's a good time to get to know Dough Mama.

"Pie is the food of the heroic," it says on the snazzy website of Dough Mama Pie & Pastry, a fantastic new source of wedge-sliced delights. That wise quote is attributed to a New York Times editorial from 1902, but it could've come from M.F.K. Fisher, Kierkegaard, Zhuangzi, or some other underappreciated genius. Anyway, now that it's Holiday Pie Season, it's a good time to get to know Dough Mama.

Basically, it's Perrie Wilkof. And as other local oven artists getting their own-boss starts have done (e.g. AJ Perry of Sassafras Bakery), Wilkof is creating great food out of her home kitchen.

A Brooklynite who'd studied Fashion Theory and Women's History, Wilkof trained in Pastry Arts at NYC's prestigious International Culinary Center (formerly the French Culinary Institute), and then moved onto Brooklyn's much-celebrated Pies 'N' Thighs, a hip darling of NYC food critics.

But the Big Apple grind began to take its toll. Then one day, while visiting her aunt again in the Columbus area (as Wilkof told me over the phone), she had a little epiphany that "Columbus is actually really cool. And the food scene is flourishing!"

Fast forward through a move to Clintonville, stints at Till (where Wilkof was slated to help launch still-anticipated Izzy and Mo's), Kittie's Cakes, The Table (where she was co-pastry chef), and now Dough Mama.

If you wanna eat like a hero, you can order Dough Mama's wonderful delicacies through its website, but you can also find them at smart operations like The Market Italian Village (where I discovered them while reviewing The Market, Mission Coffee Co., Challah food truck, Yellow Brick Pizza and Clintonville Community Market.

I've been wowed by everything I've tried. This includes (about $3/piece and $30/pie) a can-taste-the-hooch, killer bourbon pecan pie with whole roasted nuts and chocolate chips; a timely pumpkin cheesecake that ate like the perfect hybrid between (organic) pumpkin pie and tangy cheesecake; lovely quiches with soft custardy curds and snappy, slightly sweet and flaky crusts supporting daydream-of-summer-like filling combos such as off-the-cob corn with dill, scallion, roasted tomatoes and cheddar.

Photo by Brooke LaValley