Not even a broken guitar string could slow Andrew Graham when he performed alongside his backing band Swarming Branch at Brothers Drake Meadery & Bar on a recent Sunday.

Not even a broken guitar string could slow Andrew Graham when he performed alongside his backing band Swarming Branch at Brothers Drake Meadery & Bar on a recent Sunday.

The supporting musicians, who included keyboardist Sharon Udoh (Counterfeit Madison), bassist Philip Kim (Connections) and drummer Adam Nedrow (The DewDroppers) on this night, matched the frontman’s recklessness lock-step, throwing themselves whole-heartedly into the rambling, delirious compositions, which drew upon generations of American music and incorporated elements of warped folk, ragtime, country-rock and more.

Generally, the music arrived in a rush, tumbling along like a raging river post-thunderstorm, echoing the rapid pace at which words flew from Graham’s mouth. Occasionally, the singer, whose delivery conjured images of early Dylan, spat his words at such high speeds that whole verses threatened to careen off the rails. “You call your friends up too many too many times,” he stuttered on one harried number.

Even at its most frenzied, however, the music never felt out-of-control, and there were ample times where the players slowed the pace to allow a bit more breathing room. On one slinky cut, for instance, the bandmates locked into a loping groove as Graham laid waste to his contemporaries. “This generation is in a bad way,” he scowled. “We want less responsibility and more praise.”

Similar sentiments bubbled to the surface on “That Constant Country Thirst,” Graham singing, “There’s no hope in the future/ There’s no shame in the past.”

Elsewhere, the meaning in the songs tended to be as tangled and thorny as the arrangements, with Graham speaking in surrealistic tongues. “It’s been refreshing to try to put a thread through your eye,” he sang in a cracked cadence on one tune.

At times, the band members played off these lyrical cues. When Graham sighed, “You should have seen our faces when she came staggering in” on one woozy number, Udoh picked up on the lyric and tickled out a keyboard line that similarly struggled to reclaim its footing.

On a night where the soundtrack sounded as if it were being constantly reinvented on the spot, one of Graham’s utterances rang particularly true: “I don’t have the patience for that now.” It’s an abbreviated attention span that made for a thrilling, endlessly entertaining evening of music.

Photo: Music_SensoryOverload_AndrewGraham_CreditAndyDowning_1106]