With a name like Unwound it was inevitable the influential Pacific Northwest post-hardcore crew would one day come unglued, which it did in 2002, just months after marking its 10th anniversary as a band.

With a name like Unwound it was inevitable the influential Pacific Northwest post-hardcore crew would one day come unglued, which it did in 2002, just months after marking its 10th anniversary as a band.

In the wake of the group's dissolution, singer/guitarist Justin Trosper stepped back from the spotlight, briefly flirting with a career as a recording engineer before enrolling in school and working toward a degree in environmental studies, which he eventually received from Evergreen State College.

"I put all my energy and focus into [Unwound], and when it went belly up I was like, 'Oh crap, I kind of put all my eggs in one basket,'" the musician said in an early November phone interview. "I don't regret … walking away from it all. In the big picture it was good for me. It wasn't making me happy to keep trying to do some of the same things, and I had to take time to figure out my life."

Now, more than a decade removed from his last live performances, Trosper has resurfaced with Survival Knife, a tough-minded rock crew that visits Double Happiness on Sunday, Nov. 16, in support of its full-length debut, Loose Power.

Though the frontman has adopted a comparatively laid-back mindset this time around - "I felt very fatalistic about music when I was younger, like, 'If I don't do this I'm going to die,'" he said of his days in Unwound - the songs themselves haven't mellowed in the slightest, and the bandmates move through gnarly road-graders like "Roman Fever" with the power and agility of a vintage Harley navigating city traffic.

Certain things have changed, however. While Unwound worked speedily, pumping out new tunes with assembly-line efficiency ("We'd practice a song twice and then play it live," Trosper said), material in Survival Knife tends to come together more slowly, with songs developing and changing over the course of multiple months. Additionally, the frontman said he spends less time inside his own head these days, terming his approach to writing for the band as "more of a 'we' thing than an 'I' thing."

"My intention with this band was for it to not be as personal, and more about concepts, without making a sci-fi concept record," he said. "It's about the state of the world or how we interact with it."

One interaction unlikely to come about anytime soon: Any type of Unwound reunion.

"It's not like we're holding out because we don't believe in selling out. It's just not realistic because of the dynamic of the people in the band," Trosper explained. "We're still trying to be creative, and we're not sitting around talking about the '90s. It's more like, 'Here's what we're doing now, even if it probably won't be as big as what we were doing before.'"

Survival Knife photo