Though English novelist Zadie Smith has often mentioned in interviews how mortified she is of her debut, "White Teeth," the novel heralded Smith as one of the most acclaimed voices in contemporary literature.

Though English novelist Zadie Smith has often mentioned in interviews how mortified she is of her debut, "White Teeth," the novel heralded Smith as one of the most acclaimed voices in contemporary literature.

Written as a 22-year-old Cambridge student, herself a product of a biracial marriage, "White Teeth's" sophisticated portrayal of a multicultural, contemporary London has won over so many critics and readers worldwide that it's caused Smith to sort of recoil from the attention. As she told Interview in 2012, somewhat facetiously, "If 20 million people like something, then that means it's probably not any good."

Now, almost two years removed from her last novel, the experimental "NW," which Smith has said is her first book written as an adult, Smith is coming to Wexner Center for the Arts Thursday to discuss, well, all those things: race, writing and culture.