On a recent Friday night at Park Street Saloon, body paint and heavy bass took over. Glamour & Glow, the self-proclaimed largest black light party in the country, set up shop in the Arena District, promising a full-on illusory experience for every reveler with a ticket. It was a good time - but not a journey down the rabbit hole.

On a recent Friday night at Park Street Saloon, body paint and heavy bass took over. Glamour & Glow, the self-proclaimed largest black light party in the country, set up shop in the Arena District, promising a full-on illusory experience for every reveler with a ticket. It was a good time - but not a journey down the rabbit hole.

"Imagine a production of high energy, visual and audible ecstasy manifesting beautiful illusions using music, art, circus artists, fashion, glowing body art," the website read in part. "Imagine a show so extraordinary it alters your consciousness." That's a tall order to fill, even for the most sophisticated event coordinator.

Upon entering, we were given 3-D glasses. "They enhance the effect," the door guy said.

"I feel like this is already in 3-D, right?" my friend said. I've never needed 3-D glasses to experience physical reality, but hell, why not?

Three rooms of madness were promised, but the only action we saw was the fashion show and painting area in Park Street Saloon, and then the sole DJ/dance party in the adjacent Social Room venue where a man in his late 50s recorded a lone hula-hoop dancer with his phone.

Sometime between 10:30 and 11 p.m., models covered in luminous body paint strutted on the stage one by one. The intricate designs covering their bodies seemed to pulsate to the music under the lighting effects. At first, everyone seemed entranced. The semi-raucous crowd had quieted and were now fixated on the stage. The slow pace of the models became more apparent 30 minutes in, when the initial excitement slightly wore off. That is, until the aerialist started.

To the side of the stage an aerial silk and ring were positioned. As soon as the last model exited the stage, an aerialist performer jumped onto the ring. Everyone gazed slack-jawed as she swung over the crowd, contorting her body around the ring. Her skin and neon costume glowed under the blacklights; the color seemed to trail behind her as she glided through the air. "This looks insane with the glasses," one partygoer said. I tried mine on; I didn't notice a difference. The crowd roared with applause once she concluded her act.

After the second bout of models, another aerialist - this time using the silk - was set to perform. She wrapped and unwrapped herself in the silk, gracefully swinging almost over the crowd. Again, the crowd erupted when she finished performing.

At the end of the show all the painted models returned to the stage and began dancing; some more passionately than others. The rest of the crowd joined in, some even jumping on stage once the models exited.

Glamour & Glow was definitely a sight to be seen, but it wasn't the fever-dream they promised. Although, I'm not sure any event could fully deliver on the promises their website made, unless, of course, they spiked the punch with acid.