It shouldn't come as any surprise that CCAD continually exhibits some of the most impressive contemporary art being produced, from both locals and artists around the country. What has surprised me - only slightly, because its par for the course - is how blown away I've been by the exhibits this summer and fall.

It shouldn’t come as any surprise that CCAD continually exhibits some of the most impressive contemporary art being produced, from both locals and artists around the country. What has surprised me — only slightly, because its par for the course — is how blown away I’ve been by the exhibits this summer and fall.

With Tom Burckhardt’s “Full Stop,” a life-sized recreation of an artist’s studio — easels, tables, bookshelves, canvases, even a bathroom — made using only black paint and cardboard, having closed Nov. 20, I had a bit of woe as I walked into the Canzani Center Gallery recently to re-examine the works housed there. “Full Stop” was utterly astounding, but I quickly found the three exhibits currently on display to be not far behind.

Almond Zigmund’s massive sculpture is a wonderful example of geometric pattern and form. The towering, hand-cut wood piece is like a cage out of Terry Gilliam’s dreams.

While Zigmund’s sculpture is a singular accomplishment, Heather McGill presents a number of energetic and breath-taking pieces. McGill is a sculpture and installation artist working out of suburban Detroit — the Cranbrook Academy of Art — and her pieces are inspired by the city’s “Fordist innovation” and the colors and paints found in a body shop.

McGill’s resulting sculptures, and a couple paper works, are entrancing. Some pieces change as you move around them, whether it’s in color or form. I like to call my favorite piece a cross between a Transformer and Rorschach test. (Most McGill pieces are “Untitled,” but it’s easy to figure out which one I’m referring to.)

The exhibit by avant-garde fashion makers threeASFOUR was the one that most surprised me. I’m not much of a fashion person, but I can appreciate the craftsmanship it takes to execute these intricate garments. Where I was absolutely blown away was the video installation designed to “provide an immersive virtual fashion show experience.”

The five-or-so-minute video is basically a runway show in the universe of M.C Escher. The model walks ever-shifting paths with swirling environments all around. It’s hypnotic in the purest form.