"Comet" is a time-hopping relationship drama; it's a story of falling in and out and in love. I had a similar relationship with the movie.

"Comet" is a time-hopping relationship drama; it's a story of falling in and out and in love. I had a similar relationship with the movie.

I loved the mix of romanticism and realism of the different phases of a relationship. I hated the too-clever dialogue. Like a typical relationship, I look back on it with a mix of fondness and disappointment.

A title card tells us the story takes places "over six years (a couple of parallel universes over)," so the romanticism and too-cleverness starts early. We see Dell (Justin Long) and Kimberly (Emmy Rossum) through an unlikely first date - the kind prone to exist in the mind of a young male screenwriter - and the later stage of coupling and uncoupling.

Writer-director Sam Esmail's multi-faceted story plays like a more bittersweet and less funny "(500) Days of Summer." His biggest crime is what I refer to as "Juno-ing" - a term I dubbed in reference to Diablo Cody's tendency to make all of her characters unnaturally quick-witted. Dell and Kimberly's lines don't feel like they come out of characters; they feel like they come off a page.

The co-stars - whom also co-produced "Comet" - are also a mixed bag. Long stretches his dramatic chops with varied results. Rossum is the better half (when she's not saddled with Esmail's dialogue).

If it seems strange that I'm still torn on "Comet" with these complaints, it's because sometimes this mix of optimism and cynicism can hit the right notes with me. If you catch "Comet" in that mindset, it's easier to forgive.