This weekend, the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum opens an exhibit celebrating 100 years of newspaper comics from William Randolph Hearst and King Features. Hearst essentially invented American newspaper comics, and he was a big fan of the low-culture artform. "He didn't want to be part of the aristocracy," said Caitlin McGurk, the library's engagement curator. "He really liked cartoonists and comics." McGurk, of course, feels similarly. We chatted recently about some of her favorite things, which, we'd like to believe, Hearst would appreciate today.

This weekend, the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum opens an exhibit celebrating 100 years of newspaper comics from William Randolph Hearst and King Features. Hearst essentially invented American newspaper comics, and he was a big fan of the low-culture artform. "He didn't want to be part of the aristocracy," said Caitlin McGurk, the library's engagement curator. "He really liked cartoonists and comics." McGurk, of course, feels similarly. We chatted recently about some of her favorite things, which, we'd like to believe, Hearst would appreciate today.

Bad Movie Nite at Studio 35

Stuff like that exists elsewhere, but not like it does here. I've never seen it so cheap and with such a dedicated audience. Everyone's drinking and having a good time and shouting along with their favorite moments. It feels like a community. One of the first times I went, they were playing "C.H.U.D. II," and it was one of my first dates with Erik [Pepple], and we told each other that we loved each other for the first time. We're pop-culture people, so it was such a bonding movement of like, "Oh, I finally found someone to go to this thing with me."

Jack Wilson at Kafe Kerouac

My first week of work I stopped in to get a coffee. [Jack] was serving me and he said, "Are you Caitlin McGurk? Did you just move here to work at the Cartoon Library?" He had read this press release announcing my new position here, remembered it, recognized me, then had the guts to say something and be really friendly. He's a quiet guy who's an extraordinary human being. He has singlehandedly, in the front room of Kafe Kerouac, built one of the most impressive small press comics shops I've seen. He has stuff I can't find at comics festivals, let alone at major comics stores.

"Tales from the Crypt"/"Creepshow"

I'm a huge sucker for old-school horror comics, where it was sort of no-holds barred, and you could write about whatever you wanted. Particularly EC Comics, which are so fun and wacky and super violent and gory, but also some of the most creative. They seem like they came out of the brain of 8-year-old kids. My mother was a huge collector of horror comics, which I didn't know until after I was involved in comics. My Uncle Ray saved a bunch of them, but he colored all over them [as a kid]. At first I was like, "Man that sucks," but it's an amazing family heirloom. My mom read this stuff, and then her annoying little brother drew mustaches on them. I feel like it's engrained in my genes to like that stuff.

"Great Expectations" by KISS

It's my anthem, has been for many, many years. For some reason during fall and winter, I try to listen to it as often as possible. It gets me super pumped up. It's got a choir part in it. KISS, I have no problem saying they're one of my favorite bands. They're misrepresented and overlooked by a lot of people. Obviously, they're famous and everyone knows who they are, but everyone thinks they're really stupid. The kitschiness is what I love. They turned themselves into comic book characters and are living it. The song "Great Expectations" sums that up to me.

Alleys of Clintonville

When I first moved here, I lived fairly close to campus, and I'd walk to OSU every day. I'd usually take the alleys so I didn't have to walk down High Street. Especially in the morning, walking down these beautifully lit alleyways covered with vines and ivy was so beautiful. For anyone who's been to Portland, so much of that little nook of Clintonville looks so much like Portland. It's got all these houses so uniquely designed and uniquely painted, and everyone has a big porch, and there are all these giant cats sleeping on the porches. It's an extremely peaceful and meditative place for me. I've had a lot of my best thinking and coffee-drinking times there.

Mansfield

People are usually disgusted with me when I tell them how I much I like it. There are so many wonderful, ornate things there. There's the penitentiary, which is where "Shawshank Redemption" was filmed. And there's the world's largest wax bible museum. It's kind of terrifying, but also just weird Ohio, weird USA type stuff. There's also one of the world's largest manufacturers of carousels, and two Coney Island-themed diners. One of the best things is the Mansfield historical museum, which has Electro, the world's first talking robot. It debuted at the 1939 World's Fair. He could talk because there was a record player inside his chest, and they had 700 words recorded on it. He also smoked cigarettes on the stage. The guy who runs [the museum] also collects cartoon art from artists from the Mansfield area, so I just love it.