In military terminology, "battle trance" refers to a psychological state that arises in wartime when combatants do not feel fear or pain, and individuals begin to move as one collective organism.

In military terminology, "battle trance" refers to a psychological state that arises in wartime when combatants do not feel fear or pain, and individuals begin to move as one collective organism.

It's this latter trait the four tenor saxophonists in Battle Trance had in mind when they selected their band moniker. The avant-jazz collective's debut, Palace of Wind, is equal parts epic and disorienting, swinging between atmospheric passages and thundering exchanges that hit with a tornado's foundation-rattling force. Throughout, there are numerous moments where the musicians blur Voltron-like into a single, indistinguishable entity.

"Most of the [rehearsal] time was spent cultivating a group sound and really trying to get to that point where we didn't even know who the sound was coming from," said Travis Laplante, 32, who joins bandmates Matthew Nelson, Jeremy Viner and Patrick Breiner for a concert at It Looks Like It's Open on Friday, Feb. 6. "One thing I think we talked about early on was the idea that this project was about becoming one entity and really being able to distill our individual identities and desires into something greater."

Battle Trance's roots stretch back roughly two and a half years, when Laplante emailed the other musicians on a whim. "At the time I wasn't terribly familiar with them as people or players," he said.

Early sessions, in turn, were designed for the quartet to develop familiarity and build rapport.

"I think in the first rehearsal we all started by holding a low B flat, which is the lowest note you can make on the saxophone, for something like a half hour just to be inside of one sound together," Laplante said. "It was very effortless. I started bringing in material, and I felt like I could barely keep up. It was like wildfire spreading."

Even now, music remains the primary force bonding the four, with Laplante describing the bandmates as "very different people."

"We all grew up playing jazz, but we're all from different parts of the country and all have different backgrounds," said Laplante, who grew up in Vermont and started playing saxophone at 10 years old at the suggestion of his mother. "I think most of our connection is unspoken; we relate on a deeper level than personality."