When poet Amy Turn Sharp and musician Sharon Udoh (aka Counterfeit Madison) first heard that their mutual friend (and bicycle advocate/activist) Jess Mathews was headed to The Master Class in Bicycle Urbanism in June 2015, in Copenhagen, they immediately wondered aloud, "What can we do to help her get there?"

When poet Amy Turn Sharp and musician Sharon Udoh (aka Counterfeit Madison) first heard that their mutual friend (and bicycle advocate/activist) Jess Mathews was headed to The Master Class in Bicycle Urbanism in June 2015, in Copenhagen, they immediately wondered aloud, "What can we do to help her get there?"

The Master Class is a three-day, intensive program made up of lectures, workshops, site visits and study tours, with the goal of teaching attendees how to build a bicycle-friendly city. But, as the program's website states, "It won't be cheap… But it will be worth it."

Their solution: Plan a Love Fest – a big, art and booze-filled party at Brothers Drake, where people donate a few dollars at the door to help pay Mathews' travel expenses, and then mix and mingle with other friends and creative types. And, while they were at it, they decided to make Love Fest a quarterly thing – a chance to support other movers and shakers' passion projects.

Turn Sharp loves bringing people together for a good cause – she is the mastermind behind the popular Word Church poetry series, now on a temporary hiatus – and like Word Church, hopes Love Fest will grow much bigger than its roots.

Sharon and I were talking recently and decided we wanted to do something for Jess, who is an amazing community activist. She works hard, and she's going to come bring so much information from Denmark to Columbus. We started ideating, and thought, "Let's throw a love fest for Jess." Let's show her how much love we have for her and for the things she does for the city. She is effecting change and it will affect all of us. Jess is very good friends with a lot of artists, and a lot of artists in this city utilize biking. We want her to help us make our city a more bike-friendly city. And she's also a great feminist role model for Columbus. I think she crosses over perfectly for this.

We decided to get a bunch of artists and musicians together, charge five dollars at the door and have a night out. That's how it started. Sharon is going to perform. I'm going to read poems. My friend Lauren Kraft is going to read her poetry. Nick D' & the Believers will play. And Heidi Kambitsch, of Open Heart Creatures, will read some love letters on stage, to Jess and to her bike. People can chill out with each other, listen to some music and remember that it's 2015, and we want to start it off right by helping others.

We're already thinking it will be fun to do it again. Love Fest hasn't even happened yet, and we already know it's going to be great, because so many people have said, "Yep, we're coming. We're going to support Jess." We all already love listening to music and poetry – why not make it about someone else a few times a year? We definitely want to keep it going. Once I get into something I like to keep it going. I get kind of jazzed by bringing people together.

I'm kind of on a break from my Word Church series. I did it for a year at Brothers Drake, and I'd like to do it somewhere else for a year – a different location. Initially I thought that just my small literary and social circle would attend Word Church. Then it exploded into, like, young boys up on stage, talking about their Tinder poems. It was crazy. I can guarantee that the people at the end of that year would never have known each other, and now we have all these different connections. It's blown my mind how much poetry opened up a new social circle for me, and how awesome Brothers Drake was to host it.

More and more now, I feel like music, writing and art are really coming together a lot [in Columbus]. People aren't just defining themselves as poets, writers or musicians; they like to do lots of different things and they like to have a chance to explore those skills on stage. The collaborative spirit in Columbus is pretty amazing. I feel like Columbus is a small, kind, interesting city where you can actually go and meet someone and say, "I'd like to work with you," and it happens. It's known that you are going to have 15 friends in common with each other.

The arts community supports me. I put weird poetry out in the world, and people are awesome and take it and buy my book. When I first moved to Columbus 15 years ago, I knew there was something special about living here. I knew I would be able to be myself in this city. It's important for me to go to other events, support other local artists, and, other people you meet, you can't help but be inspired by their stories. I just want to be inspired.

At Love Fest, I hope that people have a great night and feel good about donating five dollars towards Jess's trip to Denmark. If you give a little, you're going to get a whole bunch back. Maybe it will even inspire someone else to think about helping someone this year. That's one of my goals: I want to give a little more than I take. In the arts community, we don't have a lot of money, maybe, but we have a lot of gifts to give.