On "Do Better," a heaving, electro-tinged ballad off Chris Brown's sixth and most recent studio album X, the controversy-courting R&B musician stumbled upon what might be the most honest admission of his young career, singing, "It's like I can't get out of my own way."

On "Do Better," a heaving, electro-tinged ballad off Chris Brown's sixth and most recent studio album X, the controversy-courting R&B musician stumbled upon what might be the most honest admission of his young career, singing, "It's like I can't get out of my own way."

For the better part of the last six years, Brown's music has taken a backseat to his various offstage indiscretions, including a recent judge's ruling that forced the singer to postpone the start of his Between the Sheets tour in order to complete court-ordered community service stemming from a 2013 probation violation. The tour is scheduled to visit Nationwide Arena on Saturday, Feb. 14.

Brown's legal troubles date back to his February 2009 assault of Barbados-born pop singer and then-girlfriend Rihanna, for which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to community service and five years' probation.

Subsequent years have been nearly as turbulent.

In June 2012 Brown tussled with Canadian rapper Drake in a New York nightclub, a scuffle that resulted in bottles being thrown and broken glass injuring several bystanders. Then in January 2013 Brown got into a widely reported exchange with R&B star Frank Ocean, allegedly hurling homophobic slurs and throwing a punch at the singer. Brown was arrested again in October 2013 after assaulting a man outside a Washington D.C. hotel. Following sentencing, he was booted from a court-mandated stay in anger management rehab for "breaking program rules by acting violently," according to a center official quoted in a probation report.

These outbursts have further tarnished Brown's reputation, preventing the singer from fully turning the page on his highly publicized assault conviction.

"If he was a straight-up model citizen from the point [when he attacked Rihanna] and that was just an isolated incident, then we wouldn't even be talking about it," said local rapper Dominique Larue, whose own experiences with domestic violence inspired her in-progress solo album Happiness Is Imminent.

It's a point echoed by Konata Holland, assistant program director at WCZB 106.7 FM, who said, "Brown's done things along the way to remind people [of his temper], like when he had that blowup incident on 'Good Morning America' [in 2011]" where, following on-air questioning related to his 2009 arrest, the singer is alleged to have trashed his dressing room, breaking a window in the process.

Despite these various misdeeds, Brown has maintained a hardcore base of fervent supporters (#teambreezy), and gradually reclaimed mainstream acceptance. His 2014 album X sold more than 146,000 copies in its first week of release, debuting at No. 2 on the Billboard charts and garnering the singer a trio of Grammy nominations.

"Everybody fell back from him for a bit there, but after a while I think people started to say, 'OK, this guy has paid his dues,'" Holland said. "You know how we are. We're a society where we like to build people up to tear them down. But we also like a good comeback story."

Regardless, some of those attending Brown's Nationwide concert are hesitant to fully embrace the performer.

"It's one of those things where you couch it and say, 'I love Chris Brown - not as a person, his music,'" said Nicole Cibella, who has been a fan of the singer dating back to the 2005 release of his self-titled debut. "Trying to get my friends to go to the concert was challenging because they were like, 'Oh, I don't want to support him.'"

Still others have taken care to separate the music from Brown's various private missteps.

"I'm there to see him as an entertainer and an artist; I try not to focus on the personal issues," said longtime fan Venessa Jones. "There are so many entertainers and celebrities who have had issues [with domestic violence] ... like John Lennon and James Brown and the guy from Queens of the Stone Age (guitarist Nick Oliveri) who held his girlfriend prisoner while they called out the whole S.W.A.T. team. Even Charlie Sheen gets the nod, and he held a knife to his ex's neck."

Brown expressed similar sentiments in a 2014 interview with Fox News.

"There could be a million other celebrities who were in the same situation, but because of the high profile-case ... they're going to always automatically associate [me with domestic abuse]," he said. "When the media associates me it's to [spread] a bigger message. It's to show the world and raise awareness for it and definitely show that it's not OK."

It's an awareness that has continued to grow amid the media swell surrounding NFL running back Ray Rice, who was captured on videotape assaulting his then-fiancee (and now wife) in a Las Vegas casino elevator in 2014, igniting widespread public discussion of domestic abuse issues.

"The fact the dialogue has been opened is very important, and it's something I appreciate," Larue said. "People who never experienced [abuse] are always like, 'Why didn't you just leave?' And it's not that easy. But now that more survivors are coming forward and sharing their stories, it could help someone who is still building that courage to leave."