"What are all these people doing here on a nothing Tuesday?" I wondered entering Lineage Brewing. Scanning the handsome and happening new Clintonville brewery/taproom, I recognized several friends and neighbors among the buzzing revelers. Their smiling faces told me Lineage is being instantly embraced by veteran scenesters.

“What are all these people doing here on a nothing Tuesday?” I wondered entering Lineage Brewing. Scanning the handsome and happening new Clintonville brewery/taproom, I recognized several friends and neighbors among the buzzing revelers. Their smiling faces told me Lineage is being instantly embraced by veteran scenesters.

Concrete blocks plus patio-facing garage doors and windows supply the welcoming space with traces of its previous incarnation as a dog-and-car wash. The spare, open and airy 60-seater also features lots of natural light, blond wood and minimalist contemporary style.

Lineage is owned and operated by two Clintonville couples with homebrewing backgrounds — one in the quartet eventually matriculated to professional beer-making at Buckeye Lake Brewery. The couples have come up with an appealing menu of distinctive beers and snacks worth venturing out for on a nothing Tuesday.

Six whimsically named drafts were available (about $5/glass; $10/flight), and they offered intriguingly diverse flavors. Shoot-the-Chutes, a cream ale titled after a ride in the amusement park that long ago graced the area, has varied from a straightforward American-style beer with more hops and character than your basic Bud to something closer to an amber ale.

IPA fans will quickly connect with the balanced Ryemora rye pale ale, but also the less-bitter (British influenced) Bricky Briffon, and possibly the West Coast-styled Spaceship #6, with pine resin notes and pronounced bitterness from simcoe and citra hops.

Lineage’s most daring and interesting beer is Aunt Bernice, a Berliner Weisse sour wheat ale. Offering a little funk and a lotta refreshing lemon, its pale straw color and minimal hops are true to style.

If you like something dark and coffee-ish, try the Mike Drop “coconut porter.” If you seek a complete breakfast-in-a-bar experience, pair it with Lineage’s $12 Bacon Spread — moist and smoky (not salty) tender bacon crumbles added to a baguette holding a pretty poached egg and maple syrup drizzles.

My favorite snacks are the little, empanada-like $6 hand pies made with Dan the Baker’s great dough. The delicate and flaky pastries arrive sparsely filled with international-riffing innards. The best are the Hanoi (zingy pork meatballs with rich “cilantro mayo” and veggie pickles on the side) and the Guillotine (duck, mushrooms plus an oniony and orange-inflected blueberry dipping sauce).

Photo by Meghan Ralston