Taking in Sleepless Wilds, the debut full-length album from dream-folk quintet Oliver Oak, feels akin to stepping gently through lush, moss-covered woodlands. Co-vocalists Kyle Tucker and Erin Mason tend to deliver their words in hushed, lullaby tones, and the lilting folk backdrop is colored in delicate acoustic strumming, muted drums and violin that frequently glides through the mix like a spring breeze passing through an open window.

Taking in Sleepless Wilds, the debut full-length album from dream-folk quintet Oliver Oak, feels akin to stepping gently through lush, moss-covered woodlands. Co-vocalists Kyle Tucker and Erin Mason tend to deliver their words in hushed, lullaby tones, and the lilting folk backdrop is colored in delicate acoustic strumming, muted drums and violin that frequently glides through the mix like a spring breeze passing through an open window.

On a recent Tuesday, the band brought this low-key sound to the equally cozy Rambling House Soda, easing through a half dozen cuts that largely echoed the intimacy of its recordings. Of course, it took a moment for the band to adjust to its surroundings, and the set opening tune got partially trampled beneath an onslaught of rumbling drums, like wildflowers underneath the feet of a careless hiker. On the follow-up “Weathered Hands,” drummer Seth Daily pulled back and adjusted his approach, tapping out the rhythm on the rim of his snare and displaying a far gentler touch when he resumed keeping the beat.

As the players adapted to the space, the music continued to blossom, reaching full flower as Tucker, Mason and violinist Devin Copfer surrounded a single microphone set on the floor of the venue for a gorgeous version of “Sleep in the Rain.” “Why do I worry this mind of mine?” the trio harmonized, as though circled around a campfire. “Maybe I just need to unwind.”

But while the music itself comforted, the lyrics, at times, suggested some deeper unrest. On one unreleased new song, Tucker and Mason appeared to sing of “being lost in the crowd” and of things being “split at the seams,” while another tune made mention of making amends.

It’s a contrast the band has explored in the past — Oliver Oak’s debut EP Adages, from 2013, included the song “Chasing Suns,” where Tucker crooned of “the heaviness to come” in a tissue-fragile voice — and it added depth and intrigue to songs that appeared more docile at first glance.