In an age where most rock bands peak early and then gradually fade from existence, the Britt Daniel-led Spoon remains something of an anomaly, increasing in power and presence with each passing year, like a five-tool prospect steadily evolving into an MVP-caliber player.

In an age where most rock bands peak early and then gradually fade from existence, the Britt Daniel-led Spoon remains something of an anomaly, increasing in power and presence with each passing year, like a five-tool prospect steadily evolving into an MVP-caliber player.

It's no parlor trick, either. Rather than chasing trends (there are no EDM flirtations lurking like landmines in the Austin, Texas crew's catalog), the musicians have embraced a minimalism that would be the envy of flash fiction authors like Ernest Hemingway, who is generally credited with writing one of the most-cited short works in fiction: "For Sale, Baby Shoes, Never Worn."

The band's latest, They Want My Soul, released in 2014, is no exception, building around little more than military-creased snare drum, staccato guitar chords, occasional garage organ flourishes and Daniel's soulful, slightly sandy yelp, which he employs to great effect on songs that range from tough and terse (crunchy album opener "Rent I Pay") to unexpectedly gorgeous (the twinkling "Inside Out").

This time around, Daniel, typically cryptic with a pen in his hand, even started writing with directness more reflective of the band's unfussy musical approach. "When you stand beside me/ I can tell I'm stronger than I've ever been," he offers with unexpected candor on "Rainy Taxi." It's a small shift, sure, but it signals a band still eager to seek out new wrinkles in a stripped-down, time-tested sound.

The Antlers opens the show.