Don't expect Pat Chase, singer, guitarist and songwriter for eclectic garage-rock hybrid Gelatinus Cube, to "like" this article if and when it's posted on Facebook.

Don't expect Pat Chase, singer, guitarist and songwriter for eclectic garage-rock hybrid Gelatinus Cube, to "like" this article if and when it's posted on Facebook.

"We live in this world now where everyone gets to pretend that everything's perfect all the time. You go on the internet and everyone is planning their wedding and there are babies everywhere and everyone has a cat, and you're thinking to yourself, 'What the hell am I doing? Where am I? Who am I?'" said Chase, 27, who joined bandmate Tim Swanson, 26, for an early May interview at a downtown coffee shop. "Everyone is pretending to be something they're not at all times. It's a weird cage we're stuck in where everyone is trying to one-up another through likes."

The band's latest, 24 Hour Rock and Roll, largely strips away this glossy outer layer, dwelling on the insecurities, fears and immaturities that frequently exist in uneasy knots just beneath the surface.

Album opener "Euthanasia" sets the caustic tone, essentially describing life as a series of tasks that need checked off before the end arrives ("When everything's perfect you can finally die!"). Then there's "Doin Great," where Chase tries desperately to convince himself everything's OK even as a lingering unhappiness gnaws away cancer-like at his innards. Elsewhere, he struggles to come to grips with his perennial outsider status, singing, "We just want to smile like normal folks do" on the slow building "Penitentiary."

"I had this experience with a couple friends last summer. It was a Wednesday night and we were just bumming out having a couple of drinks, and I look over and there was this group of people about the same age as us just partying their faces off," said Chase, who joins his bandmates for a record release show at Brothers Drake on Saturday, June 13. "Lady Gaga is blasting and they're taking selfies and high-fiving and the couples are kissing and they're having a wonderful time. And I'm just like, 'Why can't I be like them? Is anyone like them?'"

While the album finds the Gelatinus Cube mates pondering some of these heavier questions - "We had a lot to say about a lot of things, so I thought it was extremely important for the lyrics to be front and center," Chase said - the music itself tends to move weightlessly, centering on a rowdy three-guitar lineup and incorporating unexpected horn arrangements.

"It's an upbeat album. The songs rock … and it's gotta be that way or else it would just be a total drag," Chase said. "It's fun to play loud, fast songs, but still be honest about what you're doing. We're not saying, 'Yeah, let's have a beer! Let's get off!' It's more substantial."