In "The Cooler," William H. Macy portrays an ill-fated man so cursed a casino owner keeps him on the payroll to stunt anyone who starts to heat up at the gambling tables. It's a hard-luck character with which rapper Senseless could likely identify, judging by a handful of lines from his debut long-player.

In "The Cooler," William H. Macy portrays an ill-fated man so cursed a casino owner keeps him on the payroll to stunt anyone who starts to heat up at the gambling tables. It's a hard-luck character with which rapper Senseless could likely identify, judging by a handful of lines from his debut long-player.

"I'm the type of cat that'll get pulled over/ And catch a DUI when he's stone-cold sober," he rhymes on "Art Hertz," spitting atop a loping, piano-driven groove courtesy of DJ Bombay, who produced a bulk of the album's soul-leaning instrumentals. Elsewhere, he describes himself as "more comfy in the middle of the pack," struggles to find the beauty in a picturesque sunset and envisions life as a "long walk down a short cliff," over before it really gets started.

"I don't know what it is. I'm just a fidgety guy [by nature], I guess," said Senseless, born Jacob Engle, who will celebrate the release of his new LP with a concert at the Moonlight Market on Saturday, June 13. "Maybe part of it is because I am only 20 and I am still figuring myself out. I'm learning everyday about me. There's no understanding life; there's just understanding yourself within it."

Growing up an only sibling, the rapper naturally gravitated toward hip-hop due in large part to the sense of community the music fostered. "It was like, 'I may not know this guy next to me, but we're family,'" said Senseless, who started rhyming at 13 and has been a fixture at hip-hop events like the Break and Knock Five in recent months.

Initially, the MC patterned his flow after the likes of Blueprint, Eyedea and Brother Ali, though he quickly learned the importance of charting his own lyrical course.

"At a certain point you have to sound like you," said Senseless. "My voice is an instrument, and I think about how it can go up and down and weave through [the beat]. That's the stuff that always got me: the harmonics. But as long as you're saying something that's true to who you are, it doesn't matter how you're saying it."

Repeatedly in conversation, the rapper circles back to the concept of personal growth - "If you're the same at 50 that you were at 20 then you've wasted 30 years of your life," he said - and he envisions his music evolving and taking on greater complexity with each passing year.

"There are always new things to talk about and new things to say," said Senseless, who has recently taken to listening to NPR programs as another means of expanding his worldview. "I still have a lot to learn; I will always have a lot to learn."